Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
GunMedia_Ben

Horror, and what it means to you?

21 posts in this topic

Hey everyone! 

 

While we're all here basically for Friday the 13th, one cannot deny that the genre overall has a major hold on fans. Sure, Jason reigns supreme with slasher flicks, and by gross is the biggest franchise out there, but what else are you watching when you want to get your horror fix on? 

 

Are you into the zombie franchise with Romero's zombies? The Monster Squad of Dracula, Werewolves and Frankenstein? Do you go for paranormal with ghosts, or perhaps its Cronenberg's human transformations? 

 

What gets you that horror fix you oh so love? (Well, besides Jason ;)

 

To be frank, Jason is my favorite character in horror. Always has been, but it's Psycho that really gives me the most 'bang for my buck,' when it comes to horror. The Shining is also a great example of what I really love when it comes to horror. The idea of humans as monsters is more of a driver for me, which is why slashers like Friday the 13th (1-3), Halloween and Sleepaway Camp are such memorable movies. 

 

So tell me, what's horror mean to you?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Slow Classic Zombie Enthusiast. (I refuse to call anything that has fast running rage infected humans "zombie movies")

 

i prefer to be actually scared though, a good Ghost movie does that to me, like The Inkeepers was pretty scary the first time watching, The Shining when i was young, Danielle Harris in Halloween 5 (4 not so much) freaked me out as a kid.

The Original Evil Dead scared the living crap out of me as a kid and still think to date its the one movie with the best and scariest atmosphere.

Asian Horror movies tend to hit those marks much better than american movies, which mostly (specially these days) seem to rely on the generic jump scare and thats just lazy film making.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I'm a big fan of the movies featuring intense creature effect work. Movies like John Carpenter's The Thing, American Werewolf in London, From Beyond, Return of the Living Dead, Chronenberg's The Fly, Hellraiser 1 & 2, At the Mouth of Madness and so on... Thematically, these movies have almost nothing in common with eachother, but they don't shy away from the effects work. These movies don't hide the creatures in shadows. Often time, they are well lit for any mistakes to be seen. It's bold. These movies also tend to be very loud movies.

 

That being said, I'm also down to watch a good ghost story, or something with a simple concept like It Follows or The Hole. And let's not forget the interesting Italian horror movies of old, either. My personal feelings on them are that they aren't necessarily good stories, but they tend to be very creative and push the limit of what I'm willing to view on screen. And of course, the slashers of the 70s and 80s will always hold a special place in my heart.

 

I'm generally willing to give any horror movie a shot, there are a few exceptions though (mainly cheap knockoff and cash-in attempts). But to me, horror is a great gift.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
 they aren't necessarily good stories

 

 something that can be said about Friday the 13th too, as well as Halloween, and its actually pretty hard to argue againt this fact.

 

but it also shows that a bad story in a horror movie is easier to forgive than any other genre.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

something that can be said about Friday the 13th too, as well as Halloween, and its actually pretty hard to argue againt this fact.

 

but it also shows that a bad story in a horror movie is easier to forgive than any other genre.

Oh, for certain. Especially for franchises that have run as long as F13 and Halloween have, you're going to get some stinkers. But I don't see that as a bad thing. I'm happy that people wanted to return to the well of these franchise and add something to them. I'd be disappointed if Halloween never made it past part 2. Or if F13 never made it to Part 6.

 

What I meant by saying the stories of the Italian movies not necessarily being good was that for a lot of them that stand out to me, it was clear that the story was more or less an excuse to string together foul and gruesome kills. To this day, I still have trouble trying to comprehend Lamberto Bava's Demons 2. But I still own and watch it every now and then, because it's still entertaining.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

totally understood your point. like Braindead also is just a carrier for insane over the top gore. its like watching porn for the story haha kind of. (i made this comparison on here already in some other topic)

 

also European horror is mostly rooted in very different aspects as american or asian horror, which might make it weird to follow or understand the premise for people from different cultures. 

and none of that is bad, just want to make that clear.

and i also like Jason X and JGTH for what they are. standalone entries in the franchise, unconnected to the overall continuity. Spin Off Movies that still know to entertain if you dont take it too serious in terms of the overall franchise.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My personal view is that all genres are defined by the specific emotions the film places on audience watching. In horror, it's fear, dread, shock, disgust, panic, etc. No matter what sub-genre,  a good horror film takes the audience on a ride between feeling safe and terrified. Audiences go to horror films because they like the sense of feeling temporary fear. It's the same reason we go to 'haunted house mazes' on Halloween.

 

The better the film, the more of a lasting effect it will have on the viewer outside of the theater. For example, if you think twice about entered a dark hallway a week after viewing a film, that is a good sign the film was successful. Although a good story is great, in horror the story does not have to be bullet proof. One of the aspects of horror is to defy logic and often horror films are about stories that do just that. 

 

Horror is a funny genre because certain aspect of even the 'worst films' can be saved by practical effects work, great performances, or elements of dark comedy. I really enjoy horror comedies. They can be entertaining without being scary, but I appreciate when one does find a why to create tense sequences. The recent zombie flick "Cooties" has a great balance of both. "American Werewolf in London" is another example, but I would dare to say that less of a horror-comedy and more of a horror film with well executed comedic scenes.   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

     Horror for me began at a very early age . When I was 3 or 4 my parents took me with them , I don't know why , maybe they could not get a babysitter , to the theater when they were going to see Jaws . As you can image I was filled with terror ,  John Williams music playing in my head every time we went to the beach or even a lake for a long time after that , which of course now I chuckle about . Shortly after that they also brought me along to a double feature of The Blood of Dracula and the Curse of Frankenstein , both starring Christopher Lee and from then on I thought Vampires were the coolest thing ever . Through out the years I have loved the feeling of watching a horror movie , watching the Fridays at 13 or 14 years old and the Evil Dead shortly after that .

 

    Horror has always been a big part of my life . I would chose many horror movies just , because of the cover they had ,which led me to some great movies , like Fright Night , Hellraiser , The Fog , Halloween , Nightmare on Elm Street , Creep Show and  The Re-Animator .I guess at some point I more or less became an addict of them . I really enjoyed the fact that it was ultimate cat and mouse , fight to stay alive stakes , where no matter it was , they could die and make things that much worse off for the rest of the people trying to survive . Sure there were the " sin " factors in many of the films , but sometimes even the good people who did nothing would get caught up to by the monster or slasher and get snuffed out . 

 

     People use to ask why I enjoyed horror movies so much and I will tell them that they are much more then just horror movies , they are survival guides and if there was ever a horde of zombies , a giant gorilla or a pack of demons from hell that they would be happy I watched all these movies . Then over the years , as many people do , you look more and more into your subject , even looking at things like Scarface's chainsaw scene to RoboCop's " brutal at the time " death by literally getting blown to pieces by gun fire . 

 

     I think that the gore I  don't see is a bit more effective that the gore I do see . Though I have push out to a few edges of the more disturbing and over the top gore movies . Ichi the Killer is always one the jumps into my mind when I think about disturbing movies . Though it is a few steps out of traditional horror . Audition was another like that . Slasher movies have become as entertaining as any action film for me , the fear factor is not really there any more , though I still enjoy the films . 

 

     Things that make me look around in a room now are more Ghostly , Spirits and Demons . The Conjuring , Dead Silence , Insidious and of course the Exorcist are movies that still have scene that will jump into my head from time to time . Spooky stuff when dealing with something like witchcraft and curses . The other thing that I enjoy are the Hannibal Lecter types . That fact that just about the time you have figured out that he is a serial killer is about 2 - 4 hours to late and you are already deep into his no escaping alive plan . They also are very complex and developed stories , which I enjoy immensely . 

 

    Other things make me cringe from time to time , but that is many due to the fact that I have been around it in real life before . Working construction for 20 years I have seen a few accidents that I kinda wish I didn't . No because it is a compound fracture , but because it is your friend . So from time to time in movies I will start getting that chill up my spine , like when someone has their hand in a sink's garbage disposal . Or the slow impending doom . The Saw franchise has a couple of those that come to mind . Someone hanging over the saw blades of a lumber mill type stuff . 

 

    In short , I was raised into the Horror genre and it has been a bizarre loving relationship ever since . I don't think it will ever not be a part of my life . Once you look into the eyes of the beast you can never forget what it's face look like .  :lol:

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a simple man, with simple pleasures.  My love for horror has always been the "Creature Features" of the 80's.  Critters, Ghoulies, pod people, Pumpkinhead, etc.  I love a good dose of supernatural flavouring and mystery as well, ex. Red Lights, The Changeling (1981), etc.  Hell I grew up and enjoyed most of Roger Corman's movies.  I even have a deep respect for Elvira and here movie macabre.  My mom would stay up with me when I was younger and we watched all the cheese old horror movies that Elvira would present.  Saturday nights after 11pm where amazing during the 80's.  Nothing but horror movies on Global network.

Sadly though, I don't care for movies that feature humans killing and psychos. (ex Saw Franchise)  If I want to see films like that, I'll just turn ont the nightly news.  

Elvira_WCGV_08_11_1984.jpg

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I started watching horror movies at around age 7 and continued to watch the whole swath of sub-genres through age 22.  Had less time when I entered the workforce, so got more selective.  Nowadays I'm all about the slasher sub-genre.

 

My favorite part of the horror movie is the last 15-30 minutes where the killer and the final girl (or guy) engage in a game of cat-and-mouse culminating with the sole survivor using his/her wits and some chutzpah to defeat the killer.  I tend to prefer one antagonist to hordes of antagonists, so the movie can really build up fear of the killer.  I prefer human (e.g. Michael Myers) or superhuman (e.g. Jason in Part 6+) or human-looking supernatural (e.g. Freddy) and tend not to be into antagonists that look too monster-movie-ish.  I prefer the killer to stay masked (or be disfigured).  I have mixed feelings about the whodunnit slashers (e.g. Scream); I really hate when the human killer is unmasked and gives some long Scooby Doo like explanation of why he/she did it.  I'm kinda indifferent about whether the victims are quick kills or gory  kills, but I don't like seeing the sole survivor lose limbs (e.g. Hostel) though a bunch of stabs/slashers are fine.  I *absolutely* hate when there is no sole survivor.  I also really hate when the killer turns out to be the main protagonist who has some sort of split personality and doesn't realize he/she is also the killer.  I don't like when there are too many survivors, just the final girl/guy plus love interest (or bestie) please.

 

I've been noticing within the Slasher sub-genre there is new sub-sub-genre of Survivalist like You're Next, Berkshire County (a.k.a. Tormeneted) and Kristy.  Basically an entire movie of cat-and-mouse with the main final girl.  I'm kinda feeling it.

 

I guess I really enjoy the atmosphere of fear/suspense created by the "pure evil" killer with the ultimate triumph of "good" by the final girl/guy,

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Horror movies have been a huge part of my life since my parents gave me the ok to watch them at age 10, (1996). I was always kind of obsessed with the Idea of "horror" films, even before I was permitted to watch it. Around the age of 7, my friend Kirk's dad (Frank) would take us to the local video store and he'd rent us anything we wanted. We'd pretty much choose anything that had at least a PG14 rating and looked like it may feature violence and boobies.
 

At first Kirk and I watched a lot of action films, his house was the first place I ever saw Rambo, Predator, RoboCop and many other ultra violent, explosion filled pictures. I hadn't even seen Gremlins until Frank smuggled the VHS into his wood panel living room for us. Hilariously though, it was Ernest Scared Stupid that inspired a change in the way I watched movies.

 
It was a mid October evening, Kirk and I sat down with the saltiest bowl of popped corn and watched in terror as an evil troll named Trantor tried to take over the world by turning children into little wooden dolls to supply his troll army with power. Sure it was silly and campy but that film scared the living shit out of me! I ran home that night and slept under the covers with no flesh exposed. I was beyond scared. I was absolutely terrified, but in a good way. I loved the rush, it was nothing like I had ever experienced before. From that day forward I've been chasing the dragon, looking for that "high" on fear again. My parents finally agreed to let me watch proper R rated horror films after I turned 10, so after my friends left my 10th birthday party mom and I rushed to the video store and rented Wes Craven's New Nightmare. The fear bar had been raised really high that night. I don't think I slept a full night through for a week.
 
Now that I'm older, movies don't really scare me the way they used to, quite the opposite actually. I now find comfort in watching a familliar horror film, reliving my youthful fright of the blood soaked frames on screen or discovering something completely new and imagining how a younger me would react. It doesn't matter what kind of day I'm having, there's a horror flick on the shelf at home that will perfectly top it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I grew up with horror. My mother being a huge Stephen King fan would read to me from his books to put me to sleep. Being born in '81 i was exposed through her to all the good 80's horror films and yes i had a plush gizmo and one of those large plastic stripe dolls. While other kids wanted a teddy ruxpin i wanted a My Pet Monster. When my mom would listen to music it would be Alice Cooper who was all about horror theatrics (i mean the man has a song about necrophilia... Need i say more?).

 

All of those things soaked into who i am and naturally I was a fan of horror. I loved how there were so many emotions and elements that can go into any horror film, they can scare you to death, they can make you laugh, they can disturb you to your core and you can even start to feel sadness for certain villians. A good horror movie is like a rollercoaster of emotions and if they did their job by the end you will have felt you have run a marathon. I just loved that.

 

Now as an adult sadly there is a bit of desensitization when I watch horror movies. So many of techniques and story mechanics of movies like slashers I have seen so many times that typically in a horror film I can figure out where the jump scares are coming or what character will be revealed as the true killer… and that’s a bummer. I miss going into a film not knowing what the hell is gonna happen next. So I have just gotten to a point where I just see it as a work of art and not as a roller coaster ride. I look at the cinematography, lighting, acting, music, set design etc and just grade it from there. I still enjoy the experience but just in a different way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm a simple man, with simple pleasures.  My love for horror has always been the "Creature Features" of the 80's.  Critters, Ghoulies, pod people, Pumpkinhead, etc.  I love a good dose of supernatural flavouring and mystery as well, ex. Red Lights, The Changeling (1981), etc.  Hell I grew up and enjoyed most of Roger Corman's movies.  I even have a deep respect for Elvira and here movie macabre.  My mom would stay up with me when I was younger and we watched all the cheese old horror movies that Elvira would present.  Saturday nights after 11pm where amazing during the 80's.  Nothing but horror movies on Global network.

 

Sadly though, I don't care for movies that feature humans killing and psychos. (ex Saw Franchise)  If I want to see films like that, I'll just turn ont the nightly news.  

 

Elvira_WCGV_08_11_1984.jpg

 

 

THIS. Creature features of the 80's. I couldn't get enough of them. 

2 people like this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

THIS. Creature features of the 80's. I couldn't get enough of them. 

Nice to see another fan of Creature Features!!  :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just having a nose through old threads and came across this ... what a good read. Great to hear other people's experiences with the genre and how they came to it.

I was born in 1980 in UK and first came to horror in the late 80s/early 90s. I think it was the taboo nature of it and the fact my friends and I would chat about Freddy and Jason on the playground that drew me in. It all seemed very cool and off limits. Fortunately I had trusting parents who allowed me to start getting in to horror on the promise that I "not have nightmares". I found more realistic scares, such as the death by fire in The Towering Inferno (which actually gave me nightmares) much more terrifying, so while horror stuff gave me a thrill it was a 'safe' scare.

Books were my entry point; for educational purposes my Mum was just happy I was reading something! I use to trawl secondhand book shops for cheap horror novels, usually drawn in by a lurid cover with a half naked lady on it ... stuff by Guy N Smith and the like. I then graduated on to Stephen King as my Dad read a lot of his stuff. 

We weren't a very well-off family so films were harder to come by. So unless I was at a mates house or they lent me a VHS I didn't get to see that much. All that seemed to  be on TV were Hammer Horror films, but occasionally the schedules chucked up something good like Friday the 13th or Alien, albeit censored versions so they could be shown on BBC or ITV without sensitive souls losing their minds.

Adulthood and my own income stream changed all that and I nabbed everything horror related. Now my preference is for anything with a good atmosphere. I also have a big soft spot for anything 1975 to 1985 as its an era that transports me back to my childhood, or the childhood I wished I'd had; I would have loved to have grown up in small town America in the early 80s, a summer camp to visit, a high school prom to attend, etc.

I guess its slightly odd that I find horror films so comforting given the subject matter but give me a slasher classic from the early 80s and I'm in heaven.  I also love watching stuff for the craft, the practical effects that they utilised back in the day; the CGI stuff that replaced it leaves me cold, and is probably why I don't have many favourite horror films from the 90s (Scream being the only exception I can think of).

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horror for me goes back to my childhood when my mom introduced me to the Alien and Predator franchise, as well as Poltergeist. I was just so fascinated with the concept of suspense and survival. When I was about 9 I found the classics (Friday The 13th, Halloween, Nightmare on Elm Street, etc) and that's when I went full into the genre.

I think it's more about being immersed into the film. The classics and certain paranormal films really engross me with the atmosphere. Obviously these films are known for not having the best storylines, but I kept finding myself wanting to know more of the lore (why do they keep coming back? How?) and overall it helped to heavily influence my writing, which I am trying to turn into a full blown career.

So to me, the genre is pretty much responsible for my life goals. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horror, to me, is teenagers dancing in swimsuits and halloween costumes in front of the almighty Jason Voorhees.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I try to watch different genres of horror to get what type of horror is being discussed. Recently, I watched Cult of Chucky and Stake Land. Stake Land is like the Walking Dead but with vampires and is an interesting take on vampire films. Cult of Chucky was good for a sequel to a franchise that luckily hasn't been rebooted. I've also looked into films that were underrated like Nightbreed.

It started when I went into a catalog my brother had of horror memorabilia, also seeing bits and pieces of the Friday films, I also watched Halloween 1 and 2 in one showing on USA when they did that. Horror was in a way learning to cope with being an outcast in middle school. I like watching films that scared me as a kid and not being creeped out by them. There's also watching Tales from the Crypt and Are You Afraid of the Dark as a teen that got me more into horror. I tend to get in a mood for horror around Halloween time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Deep question. Born in '82 so most can guess where this is going. Poltergeist was the first I movie series I saw as a kid and it terrified me. Hanging out with my grandpa, we loved watching Critters and Ghoulies together. Around this time i watched The Birds and Night of the living Dead.  Both were the most terrifying films to me. As I got older i got into the slasher genre big time. My mains were Jason and Freddy. Also loved Halloween, Sleepaway Camp, and Child's Play films. Around 13 or 14, I was a giant AOL nerd. I watched Night of the Living Dead again and learned about George Romero. I watched his big ones that summer. I fell in love with Savini's effects immediately. From Dawn of the Dead, I learned about Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci. From there I went on a big kick of Eurohorror. 

I read some Clive Barker so I spent a bit of time with his movies, as well as Craven, Carpenter, Cronenberg, Classic Universal and Hammer films, etc. I was fairly bored of slashers around this point and enjoyed stories with depth. I was bored with horror based off jump scares. I began to read Lovecraft and Stephen King so the bizarre fascinated me. 

In my late teens, early 20s I was a gorehound. HGL, the French films Inside, Martyrs, and Frontier(s), Takashi Miike, the Korean Vengeance trilogy, Guinea Pig series, Fulci and such. Nowadays I am not real into shock value any more, but still love the special effects.

Today, my favorite thing about horror is putting on a soundtrack and playing a horror game. Immersing myself in these dark worlds and trying to survive. Few movies are thrilling to me as much as the stories told in books and games. Nothing like putting on a soundtrack from Waxwork Records and reading pulp horror or some Lovecraft or Barker. 

Horror to me is us dealing with our fears in a fun and thrilling way of exploring them. Thats the attraction to me, the thrill. Whether intense ambience from music, a sudden intense feeling or the knot in your throat of your stomach rising; your heart pumping and breathing increases. The feeling of being unnerved. 

 Obviously one of humanities biggest fears throughout history is death. We all know we will die, but how. To me, the fear of the unknown is terrifying. Whether it's what is on "the other side",  possibilities of science, influence of government power. We all fear things we don't totally understand or are out of our control. Horror has a way of conveying messages and morals other genres don't. Horror is also an escape to worlds more cruel than our own, maybe that makes us appreciate what we have more.

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Horror Means to me...Brutality,Blood,Guts, and screaming in terror of a human or creature!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 12/17/2015 at 9:37 AM, GunMedia_Ben said:

Hey everyone! 

 

While we're all here basically for Friday the 13th, one cannot deny that the genre overall has a major hold on fans. Sure, Jason reigns supreme with slasher flicks, and by gross is the biggest franchise out there, but what else are you watching when you want to get your horror fix on? 

 

Are you into the zombie franchise with Romero's zombies? The Monster Squad of Dracula, Werewolves and Frankenstein? Do you go for paranormal with ghosts, or perhaps its Cronenberg's human transformations? 

 

What gets you that horror fix you oh so love? (Well, besides Jason ;)

 

To be frank, Jason is my favorite character in horror. Always has been, but it's Psycho that really gives me the most 'bang for my buck,' when it comes to horror. The Shining is also a great example of what I really love when it comes to horror. The idea of humans as monsters is more of a driver for me, which is why slashers like Friday the 13th (1-3), Halloween and Sleepaway Camp are such memorable movies. 

 

So tell me, what's horror mean to you?

Watching horror films feels like I am breaking the rules for me for some reason.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0