Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ahab

The Evolution of Horror Movies

Recommended Posts

Making new threads is not usually my thing... But here we go.
@SirMang I shall post my reply to your post in the patch thread here... then we can stay on topic both here and there. But this is a bit weird without the original posts on the topic.
@Slasher_Clone, @DontZzz34, @Gottaevil you all had some interesting points there about this... so if any of you are interested in continuing that conversation, we can do so here without cluttering up the patch thread.

   To continue with a reply to SirMang's post...  Peeping Tom was released two months before Psycho. Psycho would have been completed filming and would have been in post production at the time of Peeping Tom's release... So it is doubtful it had any influence on Psycho at all... at least as far as anything in the movie itself was concerned. But the reaction to that movie and how it did at the box office were most definitely a huge influence on how Psycho was promoted... and may have had a some influence on it from the editor's perspective.

    Off camera kills were done for a reason back then... people just couldn't handle something that horrifying at the time. Frankenstein (1931) for instance was not very graphic at all compared to later movies... But people were feinting in the theaters. It also had the first child murdered in a movie that I am aware of... off screen of course. Today, we are somewhat desensitized to the blood and gore in movies. Off camera kills were often done by showing the struggle as they moved the camera to focus on the combatant's shadows... not everything was left up to imagination... but they could not show the violence on that level first hand at the time.

   Argento was awesome... and without him, Dawn of the Dead would not have been made at all... or at least not for many years to come.
   The evolution of music in movies is very strange at some points... Silent movies were nothing but music... and the first year or two of "talkies" had nothing more than a bit of music for the opening credits and sometimes... for the end titles... and that was it. It feels weird watching movies like Dracula (1931) which was released before Frankenstein and had no soundtrack beyond its overture. Music adds more to a movie than most people realize. 

   I will come back and write a post about earlier horror movies and their influence on movies that followed them some time later if there is interest... This thread could point out some older movies that some may not have heard of that they may find of interest if the conversation continues.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the inclusion, and I’d love to talk about more early slashers or horror in general. On with the discussion....

Dawn is an interesting movie but I find more can be said about Night of the living dead, it’s not as gory and Dawn definitely influenced future film makers but I think Night’s still socially relevant today which Dawn struggles with. It’s funny that Night kicked off the zombie craze but doesn’t actually contain any zombies, the dead in Night are actually Ghouls (which are middle eastern monsters of non human origin but work as well as ex-humans). 

Night casting a black man as a white working class hero is most comparable to Ripley being written as a man but played by a woman, Ripley is the most badass final girl of all time, I can’t help but think this is related to her dialog being left untouched and Sigourney Weaver  playing it in such a straight and genuine fashion. It effects the overall feel when a switch like this is preformed, but modern movies mostly fail to get why it worked in earlier films. 

I love all the old zombie movies almost as much as classic slashers, glad you started a thread man.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the inclusion as well on this thread. It’ll be a interesting discussion. While I don’t know a whole lot about psycho or peeping Tom. I can’t say much about those movies..... I’m going to have to give them a watch sometime though! 

I remember we were discussing what truly kicked off slasher films, Friday the 13th and Halloween. Which I think is accurate. They seem to be the most popular of slashers. I think we all know Friday the 13th got their inspiration from Halloween. I wonder where Halloween got their inspiration from? Also where Texas chainsaw massacre got their inspiration? There’s definitely a pattern that started from somewhere that led to one movie to another

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The fascination with horror movies over the years has definitely evolved from being tense from the atmosphere created to simply being outright shocked. The originals like Dracula,  Frankenstein,  etc were basically entering uncharted territory and set the stage for the later efforts.  We can thank Hitchcock for understanding the effect of suspense over gore, and I'm grateful Carpenter was influenced by his examples. I do enjoy the old black and white movies simply because those are the ancestors to what we enjoy today. The Hammer films were another great series with knew how to raise the hairs on your neck.  After Halloween and Friday the 13th, the horror movies were all shock and jump at you types, and they most certainly have their place in theaters. With the advanced special effects available today,  it was only inevitable that the shock movies would more commonly use them. The originals used what they had at the time and they did well.  I notice a recent trend in movies that have returned to the formula of suspense and atmosphere over gory effects,  and I'm grateful for that. People like to be scared,  and both types serve that need quite well.  Also, Texas Chainsaw was influenced by Ed Geins story, which is another point. Today's movies have more history to use as source material, so the story lines can be more diverse and original.  The zombie craze was indeed started by Night of the Living Dead,  and I think it was far superior to the sequels that relied on gory zombie munching than plot and suspense. I hope I didn't bore you with this.  Cheers and game on, my friends 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should also point out that the case file of Ed Geins was also the inspiration for Psycho and influenced Silence of the Lambs. The film about him starred Kane Hodder,  who looks nothing like Ed but portrayed him perfectly. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...