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Smitty_Voorhees

Friday the 13th: The Game: The Movie! (fan fiction script)

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Maybe one day we'll get a proper F13 movie again. Until then, at least we have the game (for now, at least). But if they do make another movie, I'm concerned how it will turn out; what makes these films special are tied very much to the zeitgeist from which they sprang, and the world has moved on. Recreating it with today's sensibilities is problematic at best (as we've seen with recent efforts), but you can't create them the same as in the 80s, because they would utterly be rejected by modern audiences. Fortunately, this is why fan fiction exists! 

When they announced the game was essentially over, I reflected and realized I had poured hundreds of hours into this game. Often while playing, I would imagine what a film version of this experience might be like. I often considered it would be kind of fun to write a fan-fic spec, but only half seriously. The recent turn of events happened to land during an opening in my schedule, so I figured, it's now or never. So I wrote it: 

http://www.mediafire.com/file/16cffdz2gobjaco/FRIDAY THE 13th THE GAME THE MOVIE.pdf

So here it is, my tribute to a game that has consumed months and months of my life, and no doubt will continue to consume more. 

EDIT TO ADD: Also uploaded to Google Drive: https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/1alhxDgb-ev9LmokPUGVv-ZBgzLfxU_yP?usp=sharing

I've tried to upload the PDF to this post as an attachment, but I keep receiving an "error".

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I wouldn't openly share my scripts online, someone could very easily steal your ideas. I've done that before and I kid you not, bits and pieces of my stuff ended up in actual movies and I never got credit for it.

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3 hours ago, deathbat96777 said:

I wouldn't openly share my scripts online, someone could very easily steal your ideas. I've done that before and I kid you not, bits and pieces of my stuff ended up in actual movies and I never got credit for it.

I know this is a common fear among writers, but you have to get over that fear if you ever want to become a pro screenwriter. Still, if you ever had a script you were seriously hoping to break into the industry with, posting it on a public forum wouldn't get you anywhere anyway. You would need a legit site, like blcklst.com (which is probably the only legit site, to be honest). 

We should also be clear what it means to have an idea stolen--you can't actually copywrite an idea. It's inevitable that you'll come up with something that is similar to something else that makes it on screen somewhere. It's unavoidable. For true plagiarism, it needs to copy significant elements of the actual story and mechanisms of plot, not just a fleeing set piece, gag, line of dialogue, or character trait. The key word there is significant.   

It takes more than a scattering of clever ideas to sell a script these days. The entire package has to be perfect -- especially in today's spec market. You not only have to have a clear and highly marketable idea, but your writing has to be great, you have to have a well-defined theme and arc, your dialogue needs to be on point, your structure needs to good, your story needs to be simple yet sophisticated, and it has to feel like a modern movie, not something that was written in the 80s or 90s (so no one-liners in your action script, for example -- unless it's a self-aware comedy or something).  

But even if someone were to take something from this script, more power to them, and good luck with whatever their project is. 

With all that being said, this isn't a script I'll be shopping around, clearly. I don't own any part of this game, the game doesn't own any part of this i.p., and the i.p. is buried in ridiculous litigation. Even if all that weren't an obstacle, I wrote this very much in the 80's style, which simply would not sell to a studio today. The pacing, dialogue, character development, and structure are all very dated and a studio or independent financer just wouldn't make it. Which is really too bad, in my opinion. I think that's part of what makes these films great. When you try to make them more than they are, they fall apart (as we've all seen with the string of recent studio remakes).

I think these films just need internal logic of their mythology and plots (and when that logic is flimsy, the film suffers as a whole); creative and entertaining kills; an internally logical way for Jason to be defeated; and characters who are likeable and/or believable, and at least some who have some sort of mini-arc (usually with an ironic twist). Like Teddy & Jimmy in part IV -- Jimmy, the sad, pathetic friend who can't get a girl winds up with a girl, and Teddy, the arrogant and self-confident guy winds up with just a teddy bear to keep him company. And, honestly, a little bit of humor goes a long way.

But today's studios will insist on deeper psychological elements and a more complicated plotlines, and a more "grounded" approach. If the original FRIDAY THE 13TH had never been made, and you wrote it today as a spec and tried to sell it, you wouldn't even get past a the low-level reader. I mean, the same goes for a lot of classics.

 

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Links still live, but files replaced/updated (some typos squashed). Thinking about maybe writing another one, but have to start the next real-life project soon so it will have to wait. But when I have another gap in my schedule, maybe I'll do a CRITTERS/GREMLINS crossover for shits n' giggles.  

 

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is this script copyright registered? I have a degree on cinematographic and audiovisual arts and I would love to work on this movie. But I  am not from USA.

 

I see many errors on the script, you shouldn't write literary things, it is not a book or a poem, scripts should be written describing only what is visible on the screen you imagine,  "lies pristine and eternal, as it has for untold centuries",  how do you translate untold centuries in that scene? do you put a signboard on the forest saying it is eternal? lol.

This script s written like if it was a novel, but if you want people to take this serious you must translate it to cinematographic lenguage. Remove things like "But there's something menacing about this quiet beauty" this is not something you can make people understand by just watching a picture, it is very literary, you must describe lightning and sounds, appearance of characters, their clothes, their names, their age, etc.

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2 hours ago, HailWotan88 said:

is this script copyright registered? I have a degree on cinematographic and audiovisual arts and I would love to work on this movie. But I  am not from USA.

 

I see many errors on the script, you shouldn't write literary things, it is not a book or a poem, scripts should be written describing only what is visible on the screen you imagine,  "lies pristine and eternal, as it has for untold centuries",  how do you translate untold centuries in that scene? do you put a signboard on the forest saying it is eternal? lol.

This script s written like if it was a novel, but if you want people to take this serious you must translate it to cinematographic lenguage. Remove things like "But there's something menacing about this quiet beauty" this is not something you can make people understand by just watching a picture, it is very literary, you must describe lightning and sounds, appearance of characters, their clothes, their names, their age, etc.

Thanks for taking the time to check it out!

For the most part I agree with you on not writing what can't be filmed, but it really depends on what you are describing. There is still a responsibility of the writer to help paint mood, tone, and evocative imagery -- but without straying tragically into purple prose. ESPECIALLY for a spec script, where you're trying to, more often than not, package your script with a director and bankable talent. 

And you'd be surprised how little cues like "...there's something menacing" are appreciated by directors, if for no other reason than it helps frame in their mind their approach to the sequence or scene. 

More critical not to do would be something like, "He pauses, giving her a double take. She reminds him of his grandmother who used to bake cookies for him when he was four." THAT is something you shouldn't write. Why? Because that is not going to help the director, it's not going to help the DP, and it's not going to help the actor. It's just wasted, useless information that's adding black to the page for no value add.

I understand a lot of instructors and how-to books and blogs state this as something to not do, but trust me, no one cares* if there's a little artistic license. The only real rule for writing a screenplay is that they can see it in their minds, and it's entertaining. Hell, even sluglines aren't strictly necessary (see Dan Gilroy's NIGHTCRAWLER script for a master class of artistic license in script formatting).  

That's great you got a degree in cinematography! Congrats, that's awesome. Are you looking to be a DP or director...? 

And this isn't copyrighted. I never copyright my scripts.  

 

*I shouldn't say NO ONE, because there are always some hyper pedantic producers or executives who will insist that every little line and detail is spelled out for the line producer or whoever is going to pore over the script to start figuring out a schedule and budget, but that's a pretty high level problem. At the spec script page, a little flavor goes a long way. 

EDIT TO ADD: I would also caution against describing physical appearance and clothes of characters unless it's pertinent to the story, other than brief, general ideas. Better to give a short handle that gives an idea of the character's hook/concept. Kind of like you were playing "Whose Line Is It Anyway" and you had to give an actor a cue card to sum up their character. 

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(As a side note, if anyone is interested in the topic of screenwriting or has any questions about getting started in screenwriting, I'd be happy to answer any questions or give your specs a read.) 

 

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9 hours ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

Thanks for taking the time to check it out!

For the most part I agree with you on not writing what can't be filmed, but it really depends on what you are describing. There is still a responsibility of the writer to help paint mood, tone, and evocative imagery -- but without straying tragically into purple prose. ESPECIALLY for a spec script, where you're trying to, more often than not, package your script with a director and bankable talent. 

And you'd be surprised how little cues like "...there's something menacing" are appreciated by directors, if for no other reason than it helps frame in their mind their approach to the sequence or scene. 

More critical not to do would be something like, "He pauses, giving her a double take. She reminds him of his grandmother who used to bake cookies for him when he was four." THAT is something you shouldn't write. Why? Because that is not going to help the director, it's not going to help the DP, and it's not going to help the actor. It's just wasted, useless information that's adding black to the page for no value add.

I understand a lot of instructors and how-to books and blogs state this as something to not do, but trust me, no one cares* if there's a little artistic license. The only real rule for writing a screenplay is that they can see it in their minds, and it's entertaining. Hell, even sluglines aren't strictly necessary (see Dan Gilroy's NIGHTCRAWLER script for a master class of artistic license in script formatting).  

That's great you got a degree in cinematography! Congrats, that's awesome. Are you looking to be a DP or director...? 

And this isn't copyrighted. I never copyright my scripts.  

 

*I shouldn't say NO ONE, because there are always some hyper pedantic producers or executives who will insist that every little line and detail is spelled out for the line producer or whoever is going to pore over the script to start figuring out a schedule and budget, but that's a pretty high level problem. At the spec script page, a little flavor goes a long way. 

EDIT TO ADD: I would also caution against describing physical appearance and clothes of characters unless it's pertinent to the story, other than brief, general ideas. Better to give a short handle that gives an idea of the character's hook/concept. Kind of like you were playing "Whose Line Is It Anyway" and you had to give an actor a cue card to sum up their character. 

yeah there may be some directors that prefer to work with scripts written like that, and that could help the actors giving the desired intention, but all my teachers and professional writers who gave me classes told that writing literarily was wrong in a screenplay. I specialized my degree on DP and sound design, I never liked to be director lol. 

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1 minute ago, HailWotan88 said:

yeah there may be some directors that prefer to work with scripts written like that, and that could help the actors giving the desired intention, but all my teachers and professional writers who gave me classes told that writing literarily was wrong in a screenplay. I specialized my degree on DP and sound design, I never liked to be director lol. 

You'll definitely find that it's way more common in practice. Again, within reason. And again, you don't want to overdo it. You definitely don't want to write like a novel, over-writing every action and description -- even if it is filmable. 9 times out of 10, we don't need to know all the superfluous details. Just enough punch to paint a quick picture, but not dwell on it. 

This spec was written in 6 days -- if this were a real script, I'd go through and find little things that might be redundant or unnecessary to tighten up. But honestly, I never do any rewriting until I'm getting notes, anyway. A producer, manager, agent, or script reader wouldn't toss a script aside for an evocative line here or there. Now, if you were describing each scene in excruciating detail and not keeping things moving, they might. (Consider that any active agent, manager, producer, or script reader is always, on average, 100 scripts behind, and have to do a LOT of reading.)

To keep up to date on the spec market and common styles, you should check out the scripts that are posted on the annual Blacklist (not the website, which is owned by the same guy, but the industry-voted list of unproduced scripts: https://deadline.com/2017/12/2017-black-list-scripts-ranking-list-screenplays-1202222558/). Although, I suppose since your career direction isn't going to be in the writing or script development phase, it's utility will be limited to you.

I have a friend from my hometown who became a DP. That takes a very specific kind of visual talent. DPs are kind of the hidden genius behind great films.

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42 minutes ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

You'll definitely find that it's way more common in practice. Again, within reason. And again, you don't want to overdo it. You definitely don't want to write like a novel, over-writing every action and description -- even if it is filmable. 9 times out of 10, we don't need to know all the superfluous details. Just enough punch to paint a quick picture, but not dwell on it. 

This spec was written in 6 days -- if this were a real script, I'd go through and find little things that might be redundant or unnecessary to tighten up. But honestly, I never do any rewriting until I'm getting notes, anyway. A producer, manager, agent, or script reader wouldn't toss a script aside for an evocative line here or there. Now, if you were describing each scene in excruciating detail and not keeping things moving, they might. (Consider that any active agent, manager, producer, or script reader is always, on average, 100 scripts behind, and have to do a LOT of reading.)

To keep up to date on the spec market and common styles, you should check out the scripts that are posted on the annual Blacklist (not the website, which is owned by the same guy, but the industry-voted list of unproduced scripts: https://deadline.com/2017/12/2017-black-list-scripts-ranking-list-screenplays-1202222558/). Although, I suppose since your career direction isn't going to be in the writing or script development phase, it's utility will be limited to you.

Mostly it is recommendable to describe details (ambience of the scene) only when it is the first time you show them on the screenplay, same with the description of characters, the second times are not necessary to describe unless it changed in something relevant to the story, and what productors, agents, maganers read for first time when you sell them your story is the executive folder you make specially for them that contains the synopsis, budget, and more things.

Agree with the DP, they are underated sometimes, like in the halloween movie (1978) Dean Cundey made an awesome work, the photography is so clean and well maintained,  those subjetive shots are great. Also I like how the screenplay of that movie is written, describing camera movements sometimes.

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2 minutes ago, HailWotan88 said:

 what productors, agents, maganers read for first time when you sell them your story is the executive folder you make specially for them that contains the synopsis, budget, and more things.

 

Mmm, no, that doesn't happen. Typically the first thing a manager and producer will read is your query & logline. (You'll never actually pitch directly to an agent -- if an agent gets involved at all, it will be through a manager or producer. A writer -- especially an unknown "baby writer" isn't going to pitch to an agent.) 

You definitely should not mention budget in a pitch or query. Ever. I mean first of all, hardly any writer is going to be qualified to run down a budget. Second of all, there are a million and one strategies for getting financing, so who knows what the budget will be. But you can indicate a low budget by saying something like, "Single-location thriller." *

Some producers, if they don't know you but are intrigued by your logline & query, might ask for a synopsis. Some pitch services, like VirtualPitchFest, require synopses for their pitches -- but honestly, I wouldn't recommend these kinds of services anyway. 

If the script gets far enough along, the writer will often be asked to write up descriptions of the characters in a little more detail for casting. Mostly personality stuff, though. Not clothes or physical appearance (other than general to fit the kind of presence you need for the role; like Drax the Destroyer in GOTG couldn't have been played by Ethan Hawke or something).

7 minutes ago, HailWotan88 said:

Mostly it is recommendable to describe details (ambience of the scene) only when it is the first time you show them on the screenplay, same with the description of characters, the second times are not necessary to describe unless it changed in something relevant to the story,

Yes, definitely. Though I've read a lot of writers who way over-describe scenes, telling us what all the furniture is, where it's located, etc, even though none of that furniture ever comes into play or is important to the story ever. Sometimes it's just okay to say, "A messy teenager's room." Or even just "bedroom" and the set designer can figure out how this character would decorate his or her room.

 

* One of the best ways for a new writer to break in is to pitch a well-written, low-budget thriller with a great concept that seems easy to cast. By low budget, typically this means something that can be shot in small, easy-to-find locations (the fewer the better). But the idea being that a producer (or manager, though honestly managers are just glorified producers who skim 10% off the top of your writing fee and have a first-look deal with you, so proceed with caution) will read your script and believe he or she has a shot at getting it financed and produced. Because at the end of the day, no one in Hollywood gives a shit if you are a talented writer. They only care about projects that seem bankable and that can make them money. That's it.  All working managers, producers, and agents know dozens -- if not hundreds -- of very talented writers. What sets apart the working writers from the hopefuls is their ability to produce content that can sell and get made in the current market (which fluctuates faster than stocks). 

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30 minutes ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

Mmm, no, that doesn't happen. Typically the first thing a manager and producer will read is your query & logline. (You'll never actually pitch directly to an agent -- if an agent gets involved at all, it will be through a manager or producer. A writer -- especially an unknown "baby writer" isn't going to pitch to an agent.) 

You definitely should not mention budget in a pitch or query. Ever. I mean first of all, hardly any writer is going to be qualified to run down a budget. Second of all, there are a million and one strategies for getting financing, so who knows what the budget will be. But you can indicate a low budget by saying something like, "Single-location thriller." *

Some producers, if they don't know you but are intrigued by your logline & query, might ask for a synopsis. Some pitch services, like VirtualPitchFest, require synopses for their pitches -- but honestly, I wouldn't recommend these kinds of services anyway. 

If the script gets far enough along, the writer will often be asked to write up descriptions of the characters in a little more detail for casting. Mostly personality stuff, though. Not clothes or physical appearance (other than general to fit the kind of presence you need for the role; like Drax the Destroyer in GOTG couldn't have been played by Ethan Hawke or something).

Yes, definitely. Though I've read a lot of writers who way over-describe scenes, telling us what all the furniture is, where it's located, etc, even though none of that furniture ever comes into play or is important to the story ever. Sometimes it's just okay to say, "A messy teenager's room." Or even just "bedroom" and the set designer can figure out how this character would decorate his or her room.

 

* One of the best ways for a new writer to break in is to pitch a well-written, low-budget thriller with a great concept that seems easy to cast. By low budget, typically this means something that can be shot in small, easy-to-find locations (the fewer the better). But the idea being that a producer (or manager, though honestly managers are just glorified producers who skim 10% off the top of your writing fee and have a first-look deal with you, so proceed with caution) will read your script and believe he or she has a shot at getting it financed and produced. Because at the end of the day, no one in Hollywood gives a shit if you are a talented writer. They only care about projects that seem bankable and that can make them money. That's it.  All working managers, producers, and agents know dozens -- if not hundreds -- of very talented writers. What sets apart the working writers from the hopefuls is their ability to produce content that can sell and get made in the current market (which fluctuates faster than stocks). 

I forgot to say that your query and logline is also on the executive folder, budget is not necessary, it really depends on the country and culture, for example in hollywood obviously you won't do that, but in other countries where the industry is more "independent" where the writer is at the same time the director and the productor, they deliver executive folders to companies to help him to finance their project. 

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*SPOILERS FOR THOSE WHO DIDNT READ- YOUVE BEEN WARNED*

 

Holy craaaaaaaaap!!!!!!!!!! That was the best thing I’ve taken the time to read in a long time. So glad I stayed up to read this!!!!!

 

First of all, I love that you have included Parts 1-8 canon. I was so shook when you explained what happened with Roy, Higgins Haven, Jarvis Residence and Vacation House, the FREAKING HALWAY HOUSE (!!!), and Camp Forest Green/Crystal Lake!!!!

 

The ending was phenomenal and to me was the highlight of the story. When Jenny returned to Packanack Lodge and saw Vickie, Pamela, etc. I was like screaming in my head!!!! That was so awesome!! And then in the aftermath when Jenny & Eric where in the ambulance— TOMMY, CHRIS, AND GINNY WERE THERE OHHHH MY GOD!!!!!! 

 

Phew that was amazing, anyways my I only have to things that upset me- technically 4. 

 

1. Tiffany’s death

2. Where’s Megan- I know about her and Tommy losing Forest Green to the government, but where is she? Shouldn’t she be with the other survivors??

3. What about Pam & Reggie? 

4. Most importantly...TRISH!!!!!! Trish is an integral part of Tommy Jarvis and has potential to have a new character come in to play (a kid). I could go on and on to convince you to add Trish but I have no energy to do so now.

 

Amazing!!!! 10/10 for sure!!!

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Just started reading, amazing job so far!!

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8 hours ago, Yoshman2523 said:

*SPOILERS FOR THOSE WHO DIDNT READ- YOUVE BEEN WARNED*

 

 

Thanks, Yoshman! 

re: Tiffany --  I was wondering if that was going to annoy anyone. :)  She's definitely set up as a more primary character, and to have her go out so abruptly almost feels unfair.

re: Other Survivors -- I at first was going to have a scene of them being led into a room, almost like an underground AA meeting, with everyone there, but getting them from the aftermath to that moment felt like the denouement overstayed its welcome. But in my mind, I imagine them all being part of this group, almost like the victims of Mr. Purple in JESSICA JONES season 1.

Glad you enjoyed it!

5 hours ago, Culp said:

Just started reading, amazing job so far!!

Thanks!  

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3 hours ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

Thanks, Yoshman! 

re: Tiffany --  I was wondering if that was going to annoy anyone. :)  She's definitely set up as a more primary character, and to have her go out so abruptly almost feels unfair.

re: Other Survivors -- I at first was going to have a scene of them being led into a room, almost like an underground AA meeting, with everyone there, but getting them from the aftermath to that moment felt like the denouement overstayed its welcome. But in my mind, I imagine them all being part of this group, almost like the victims of Mr. Purple in JESSICA JONES season 1.

Glad you enjoyed it!

Thanks!  

What a relief!!! No problem.

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Definitely the era of fan scripts and fan creations! F13.com just posted an article about a fan script by someone named Chris Gehrt. Since he had a meet-and-greet with Platinum Dunes, I'm assuming he's a repped and/or working screenwriter. Here's the article, with a link to his fan script: http://www.fridaythe13thfranchise.com/2018/07/read-sequel-script-written-for-platinum.html

The article doesn't specify who this guy is, but maybe this guy? https://www.imdb.com/name/nm1812751/?ref_=tt_ov_dr

 

 

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This is fantastic!! I would love to see this turned into an actual fan film. 

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42 minutes ago, A.J. Mason said:

This is fantastic!! I would love to see this turned into an actual fan film. 

Thanks, A.J.! Appreciate the read!

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On 7/8/2018 at 9:47 AM, Smitty_Voorhees said:

re: Tiffany --  I was wondering if that was going to annoy anyone. :)  She's definitely set up as a more primary character, and to have her go out so abruptly almost feels unfair.

This death didn't bother me. It's a big part of the game. Someone needed to die this way. The Vanessa death was great for the same reason. 

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9 hours ago, A.J. Mason said:

Someone needed to die this way. The Vanessa death was great for the same reason. 

Glad those paid off! Those TK deaths are so universal for people who've spent enough time in this game that I think I thought, verbatim, the same thing: "Someone needs to die this way." 

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