Jump to content
TheButtonMasher

English lessons.

Recommended Posts

English lesson #001

What is the difference between There, Their and They're?

THERE

There is the opposite of Here. It means 'in that place' not here.

  • A: Where is my book? – B: It's over there.
  • I will look for a hotel to stay when I arrive there.

There is/There are = to show that something exists.

  • There is a book on the table
  • There are many countries in Europe.

THEIR

Their is a possessive adjective which is used before a noun. It shows possession, that something belongs to them.

  • Their house is big.
  • All of their friends were crazy.
  • The children put their books in their school bags.

THEY'RE

They're is a contraction of they are.
e.g. They're happy = They are happy

They're is usually before an adjective or a verb ending in ING.

  • They're very interested in the project.
  • I personally think they';re crazy!
  • They're singing loudly.
  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TheButtonMasher said:

What is the difference between There, Their and They're?

THERE

There is the opposite of Here. It means 'in that place' not here.

  • A: Where is my book? – B: It's over there.
  • I will look for a hotel to stay when I arrive there.

There is/There are = to show that something exists.

  • There is a book on the table
  • There are many countries in Europe.

THEIR

Their is a possessive adjective which is used before a noun. It shows possession, that something belongs to them.

  • Their house is big.
  • All of their friends were crazy.
  • The children put their books in their school bags.

THEY'RE

They're is a contraction of they are.
e.g. They're happy = They are happy

They're is usually before an adjective or a verb ending in ING.

  • They're very interested in the project.
  • I personally think they';re crazy!
  • They're singing loudly.

This

 

Lol :) *They're all laughing *

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

English lesson 002

 

Affect and effect are different in meaning, though frequently confused. Affect is chiefly used as a verb and its main meaning is ‘to influence or make a difference to’, as in the following example sentences:

The pay increase will greatly affect their lifestyle.

The dampness began to affect my health.

The weather will affect my plans for the weekend.

Effect, on the other hand, is used both as a noun and a verb, although is more commonly used as a noun. As a noun it means ‘a result or an influence’, as in:

Move the cursor until you get the effect you want.

The beneficial effects of exercise are well documented.

Over time the effect of loud music can damage your hearing.

When used as a verb effect means ‘to bring something about as a result’. It’s most often used in a formal context as oppose to everyday English:

Growth in the economy can only be effected by stringent economic controls.

The new policies did little to effect change.

The prime minister effected many policy changes.

The key thing to remember is that effect is most commonly used as a noun, whereas affect is typically used as a verb.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

@TheButtonMasher You know that your not going to change anything with this. People obviously refuse to learn, and their going to keep making the same mistakes. What your saying does not effect them at all, and their going to tell you to butt out of they're conversations. This really is a good lesson, but I don't think it will have the desired affect. I applaud you're efforts though! ;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, Rexfellis said:

@TheButtonMasher You know that your not going to change anything with this. People obviously refuse to learn, and their going to keep making the same mistakes. What your saying does not effect them at all, and their going to tell you to butt out of they're conversations. This really is a good lesson, but I don't think it will have the desired affect. I applaud you're efforts though! ;)

 

Might as well try.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Just now, TheButtonMasher said:

Might as well try.

Really? You're going to pretend that nothing happened?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, Rexfellis said:

Really? You're going to pretend that nothing happened?

Omg I just realised. You're going to hell. I hope you realised this.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, TheButtonMasher said:

Omg I just realised. You're going to hell. I hope you realised this.

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

YOUR: Turn your mic off, buddy. jason can hear your crappy mumble rap. 

YOU'RE: You're the reason I'm glad you can mute people. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

English lesson 3

Definition of troll

troll1
trɒl,trəʊl/
noun
noun: troll; plural noun: trolls
  1. (in folklore) an ugly cave-dwelling creature depicted as either a giant or a dwarf.
Origin
early 17th century: from Old Norse and Swedish troll, Danish trold . The first English use is from Shetland; the term was adopted more widely into English in the mid 19th century.
 
troll2
trɒl,trəʊl/
noun
noun: troll; plural noun: trolls
  1. 1
    a person who makes a deliberately offensive or provocative online post.
    "one solution is to make a troll's postings invisible to the rest of community once they've been recognized"
    • a deliberately offensive or provocative online post.
  2. 2
    a line or bait used in trolling for fish.
verb
  1. 1
    make a deliberately offensive or provocative online post with the aim of upsetting someone or eliciting an angry response from them.
    "if people are obviously trolling then I'll delete your posts and do my best to ban you"
  2. 2
    carefully and systematically search an area for something.
    "a group of companies trolling for partnership opportunities"
    • fish by trailing a baited line along behind a boat.
      verb: troll; 3rd person present: trolls; past tense: trolled; past participle: trolled; gerund or present participle: trolling
      "we trolled for mackerel"
  3. 3
    BRITISH
    walk in a leisurely way; stroll.
    "we all trolled into town"
  4. 4
    sing (something) in a happy and carefree way.
    "he trolled a note or two"
Origin
late Middle English (in the sense ‘stroll, roll’): origin uncertain; compare with Old French troller ‘wander here and there (in search of game)’ and Middle High German trollen ‘stroll’. The computing senses (first recorded in 1992) are probably influenced by troll1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×