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Beetlejuice91

Anyone here write horror stories?

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Just curious if anyone writes any horror stories or just likes to write. I've written a novella that took me about 15 years to finish. Long story short, I had the beginning for it back in 2002 but stopped due to school. I went back to it in 2011 and got the main idea down. From 2012-2015, I expanded upon it and went through editing and ideas from other writers. I finished the final copy back last year.

Basically, it's Ghostbusters meets the Expendables meets Call of Duty. The Ghostbusters films were inspirations along with Vampire$ from John Steakley and other horror shows and books I grew up with. It's more of a mockumentary about a ghost hunting team. Part of it also involved helping ghosts find peace and getting to the other side instead of just shooting them.

I've been considering writing a different take on the Sleepy Hollow story and putting it in the style of the Hatchet films.

Any writers here?

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I wrote several drafts of my own take on Halloween in middle and high school that were completely awful. Other than that, I'm about to start on my own script for a Friday the 13th movie. It's going to be set in the timeline of the first 7 movies. It's a direct sequel to New Blood that ties it into Jason Lives and it ignores anything after either of those movies. It's going to be a movie where Tommy is the town sheriff and he teams up with Tina Shepherd to finally kill Jason for good. 

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I'm a writer myself. I've actually written a Halloween script & about six F13th scripts. After years of listening to the (good) ideas from fans on various sites, I kind of compiled as many as I could while telling my own stories. It's my hope that some day soon I'll be able to inundate you all with those stories so we can get back to hitting theaters to have a good time at ole Camp Crystal Lake. ;)

Somebody tell me where Sean is. lol

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Writer here, with a strong interest and knowledge base in writing comic book scripts. I have some genuine aspirations to do stuffs with my talent, but I have had a rough time as late, between just getting to a point where I can comfortably pay my bills and then spending the last week in the hospital, and three weeks in agony before that...

..Turned out I had Diverticulitis and an abscess in my bowels that inflamed my appendix. I had surgery last Thu that cut out that chunk of my bowels & my appendix and put in a temporary (here's where things get embarrassing) colostomy bag. Now I'm stuck in the hospital until next Friday or so, afterwards I will have to live with this fucking bag until around Christmas.

The reason that I bring up all this unpleasantness is that it really has lit a fire under my ass to return to me writing and accomplish something with it. I know I have the talent, I finally have the opportunity, due to being on top of things financially, and having seen how randomly fragile my life can be... I am prepared to put up or shut up and put some more stories out there once again.

Once I am out of the hospital and more together I will post more details of what I work on and want to do an whatnot, and see if maybe some of us are compatible with our storytelling goals :).

 

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8 hours ago, Emperiex said:

I'm a writer myself. I've actually written a Halloween script & about six F13th scripts. After years of listening to the (good) ideas from fans on various sites, I kind of compiled as many as I could while telling my own stories. It's my hope that some day soon I'll be able to inundate you all with those stories so we can get back to hitting theaters to have a good time at ole Camp Crystal Lake. ;)

Somebody tell me where Sean is. lol

You're probably kidding, but there are so many legal reasons as to why Sean would never read your script.

To anyone serious about breaking into the screenwriting biz -- my best advice is to write ORIGINAL material. You won't get anywhere writing a spec based on material you don't own. Slashers also won't get you anywhere right now. Contained thrillers, however, are a great calling card.

With that being said, the likelihood of your script selling are very, very low (the spec market isn't what it used to be, and most specs that sell now are either from a proven talent, or have talent attached), but you might be able to get the attention of a producer or manager to start developing new material. But make no mistake, if you are just starting out writing scripts and you're self taught, it's going to take you years of practice and many, many screenplays before you are at a passable level to start getting people's attention.

Good luck.

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Yeah, as with every rule of thumb, there will always be exceptions and whatnot, but never, ever start out writing about anything that isn't an original creation of your own. Unless you are doing it purely out of fun and not out of any true desire to succeed.

 

 

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18 hours ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

You're probably kidding, but there are so many legal reasons as to why Sean would never read your script.

To anyone serious about breaking into the screenwriting biz -- my best advice is to write ORIGINAL material. You won't get anywhere writing a spec based on material you don't own. Slashers also won't get you anywhere right now. Contained thrillers, however, are a great calling card.

With that being said, the likelihood of your script selling are very, very low (the spec market isn't what it used to be, and most specs that sell now are either from a proven talent, or have talent attached), but you might be able to get the attention of a producer or manager to start developing new material. But make no mistake, if you are just starting out writing scripts and you're self taught, it's going to take you years of practice and many, many screenplays before you are at a passable level to start getting people's attention.

Good luck.

I am joking with the last sentence of the post but I absolutely plan on tackling F13th and nothing is going to deter me from that because all of the scripts I wrote regarding the series are passion projects. I'm aware of how to get to the point of having it made, I'm just currently busy with a litany of other things so I'm playing the waiting game before I act on it. I have literally dozens and dozens of scripts that branch across all genres so writing original material isn't a problem for me. I've already been writing scripts for the past decade & not to sound arrogant but I've learned enough to be able to qualify as a competent writer. And a large portion of my knowledge has been obtained from reading scripts from some of the best movies that have been made. The best way to learn is to pay attention to those that are the best in their field...hell, even reading scripts for terrible movies can teach you quite a bit.

Add to the fact that I'm in the process of building my own company so really, my only focus is getting investors when the time comes. I know who to target and how to present it to them, I'm just waiting until I have enough clout to get to that point. I'd advise anyone else to do the same.

I'm absolutely not looking for F13th to be my "golden ticket" or anything of that sort. I have other scripts to get the ball rolling in that regard.

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5 hours ago, Emperiex said:

I am joking with the last sentence of the post but I absolutely plan on tackling F13th and nothing is going to deter me from that because all of the scripts I wrote regarding the series are passion projects. I'm aware of how to get to the point of having it made, I'm just currently busy with a litany of other things so I'm playing the waiting game before I act on it. I have literally dozens and dozens of scripts that branch across all genres so writing original material isn't a problem for me. I've already been writing scripts for the past decade & not to sound arrogant but I've learned enough to be able to qualify as a competent writer. And a large portion of my knowledge has been obtained from reading scripts from some of the best movies that have been made. The best way to learn is to pay attention to those that are the best in their field...hell, even reading scripts for terrible movies can teach you quite a bit.

Add to the fact that I'm in the process of building my own company so really, my only focus is getting investors when the time comes. I know who to target and how to present it to them, I'm just waiting until I have enough clout to get to that point. I'd advise anyone else to do the same.

I'm absolutely not looking for F13th to be my "golden ticket" or anything of that sort. I have other scripts to get the ball rolling in that regard.

If you're really serious about becoming a professional screenwriter, I recommend taking what you believe is your very, very best script, write a great logline and short pitch, and start querying managers. Not sure what your company has to do with your ambitions of being a pro screenwriter, though.

If the manager likes your pitch, he or she will request a read. Give them at least 3 weeks to read it. If they think it has merit, then you can get to work on improving your craft. Likely what will happen is they will either want to develop the script with you and try to shop it around, or they'll ask "what else you got." Either is a good first step.

But I got to be frank, if all you've been doing is reading scripts and writing in a vacuum, then it's very likely you have a ways to go, which you'll realize once you start working with someone in in the industry (the manager). Reading scripts is always good, but you should read the scripts off the annual Blacklist (the industry-voted one -- not the website) to see what kind of specs are getting people around town excited. The market is always changing. The worst thing you can do is read scripts that are 5+ years old, or watch classic movies, and try to emulate those. That will bleed through in your writing, and you'll feel outdated. You have to tap into the zeitgeist and feel fresh and current, with not only your concepts but also your voice.

If you want to one day write for a movie like FRIDAY, you'll definitely need to get a sale to a guild signatory and join the union. By that point you'll also have an agent, so you'll be able to go up for those OWAs if/when one opens for it. But be warned -- you'll be going up against a lot of other writers who want the gig. You'll have to get to L.A. for these meetings, too. If you don't live in L.A. or at least close enough to be able to go to general and pitch meetings, then it's going to be really hard to break into the industry. Nearly all of the work you will get will be writing on projects that need a screenwriter -- not you selling your own original material (ironic, since you need a really outstanding piece of original material to break in).

On the other hand, if you can establish your "brand" as a writer of good thrillers, then the job might be easier to land. A lot of writers break in with a certain genre and kind of stay in that space, and develop a rep for it (like Anthony Jaswinski, who sells high-concept thrillers left and right).

Also, don't tell a manager that you have "dozens & dozens of scripts." You can tell them that over the years you've written dozens, but that they were you building your craft. Don't try to sell them an idea that you have a back catalogue of a bunch of available scripts. That will just make them think you have a slush pile of garbage. And they would tell you to pick only 1 or 2 of what you think is your best work and send it to them, and they'll evaluate you on those. Now, if both of those scripts just are mind-blowingly awesome, then they might want to read the others. But it's very unlikely that will be the case. There are thousands of very, very, very talented screenwriters in L.A. who can't get work. It takes a lot more than being a great writer.

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7 hours ago, Smitty_Voorhees said:

If you're really serious about becoming a professional screenwriter, I recommend taking what you believe is your very, very best script, write a great logline and short pitch, and start querying managers. Not sure what your company has to do with your ambitions of being a pro screenwriter, though.

If the manager likes your pitch, he or she will request a read. Give them at least 3 weeks to read it. If they think it has merit, then you can get to work on improving your craft. Likely what will happen is they will either want to develop the script with you and try to shop it around, or they'll ask "what else you got." Either is a good first step.

But I got to be frank, if all you've been doing is reading scripts and writing in a vacuum, then it's very likely you have a ways to go, which you'll realize once you start working with someone in in the industry (the manager). Reading scripts is always good, but you should read the scripts off the annual Blacklist (the industry-voted one -- not the website) to see what kind of specs are getting people around town excited. The market is always changing. The worst thing you can do is read scripts that are 5+ years old, or watch classic movies, and try to emulate those. That will bleed through in your writing, and you'll feel outdated. You have to tap into the zeitgeist and feel fresh and current, with not only your concepts but also your voice.

If you want to one day write for a movie like FRIDAY, you'll definitely need to get a sale to a guild signatory and join the union. By that point you'll also have an agent, so you'll be able to go up for those OWAs if/when one opens for it. But be warned -- you'll be going up against a lot of other writers who want the gig. You'll have to get to L.A. for these meetings, too. If you don't live in L.A. or at least close enough to be able to go to general and pitch meetings, then it's going to be really hard to break into the industry. Nearly all of the work you will get will be writing on projects that need a screenwriter -- not you selling your own original material (ironic, since you need a really outstanding piece of original material to break in).

On the other hand, if you can establish your "brand" as a writer of good thrillers, then the job might be easier to land. A lot of writers break in with a certain genre and kind of stay in that space, and develop a rep for it (like Anthony Jaswinski, who sells high-concept thrillers left and right).

Also, don't tell a manager that you have "dozens & dozens of scripts." You can tell them that over the years you've written dozens, but that they were you building your craft. Don't try to sell them an idea that you have a back catalogue of a bunch of available scripts. That will just make them think you have a slush pile of garbage. And they would tell you to pick only 1 or 2 of what you think is your best work and send it to them, and they'll evaluate you on those. Now, if both of those scripts just are mind-blowingly awesome, then they might want to read the others. But it's very unlikely that will be the case. There are thousands of very, very, very talented screenwriters in L.A. who can't get work. It takes a lot more than being a great writer.

Thanks, I appreciate all of the suggestions.

I've been searching for a manager, but it's sort of been put on the back burner as of late because there have been so many that claim they're looking for people to manage but aren't serious. So I've kind of put a pause on it recently but I do plan to resume my search soon.

I actually do that from time to time. I'm always looking around to see what companies are searching for (i.e what's currently hot & what they couldn't care less for). I don't try to emulate older scripts or movies, but there is a lot of things they've taught me in how I've approached my own work. Honestly, while I try to do like you suggested in remaining current, I do my best not to emulate anyone. Too many people think copying others is the way to go and more often than not it just comes off as being uninspired and lazy.

Regarding the dozens of scripts, all I can say is they all technically correlate to one another in a shared universe because that was initially what made me want to write scripts: establishing my own universe of characters. So it's actually very relevant to my eventual pitch that it be mentioned. The movies don't necessarily depend on one another, but they all operate in the same space is what I mean. It's not a case of just a bunch of pieces of work that are just random, I've meticulously put all of this together over the years & finally have them all correlating in a truly cohesive way. My whole goal in doing this is when they are pitched is to offer a package deal. Y'know: "an offer they can't refuse" type of situation.

I totally understand about the L.A. bit. That's another reason I've pulled back a little on trying to pitch & just worked on completing scripts until I can get in the position to where I can move out there, which I've always planned to do anyway. Not getting off-topic but music is my initial calling & that's what people currently know me for so that's where a large portion of my focus has been going until the necessary clout is garnered. One thing I've learned is that the main thing people from L.A. and anywhere else want to know is if they're going to make money off of you. And if that's a resounding 'yes' then they'll absolutely go for it.

But you're right on with this post, though. These are the things I've been reading over the years that I've made sure to lock into my mind because they are more crucial than most realize. Another thing people don't realize is that in this business you have to have an almost infinite amount of patience and determination. Otherwise, you can falter very quickly.

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Recently I started writing horror stories. It all started with the fact that I spent the night at home myself for a whole week.

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If anyone is wanting to have their stories posted on a platform that gets a pretty decent amount of views, feel free to hmu. Always looking for extra content and provide exposure for writers.

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On 8/31/2017 at 6:04 PM, Smitty_Voorhees said:

If you're really serious about becoming a professional screenwriter, I recommend taking what you believe is your very, very best script, write a great logline and short pitch, and start querying managers. Not sure what your company has to do with your ambitions of being a pro screenwriter, though.

If the manager likes your pitch, he or she will request a read. Give them at least 3 weeks to read it. If they think it has merit, then you can get to work on improving your craft. Likely what will happen is they will either want to develop the script with you and try to shop it around, or they'll ask "what else you got." Either is a good first step.

But I got to be frank, if all you've been doing is reading scripts and writing in a vacuum, then it's very likely you have a ways to go, which you'll realize once you start working with someone in in the industry (the manager). Reading scripts is always good, but you should read the scripts off the annual Blacklist (the industry-voted one -- not the website) to see what kind of specs are getting people around town excited. The market is always changing. The worst thing you can do is read scripts that are 5+ years old, or watch classic movies, and try to emulate those. That will bleed through in your writing, and you'll feel outdated. You have to tap into the zeitgeist and feel fresh and current, with not only your concepts but also your voice.

If you want to one day write for a movie like FRIDAY, you'll definitely need to get a sale to a guild signatory and join the union. By that point you'll also have an agent, so you'll be able to go up for those OWAs if/when one opens for it. But be warned -- you'll be going up against a lot of other writers who want the gig. You'll have to get to L.A. for these meetings, too. If you don't live in L.A. or at least close enough to be able to go to general and pitch meetings, then it's going to be really hard to break into the industry. Nearly all of the work you will get will be writing on projects that need a screenwriter -- not you selling your own original material (ironic, since you need a really outstanding piece of original material to break in).

On the other hand, if you can establish your "brand" as a writer of good thrillers, then the job might be easier to land. A lot of writers break in with a certain genre and kind of stay in that space, and develop a rep for it (like Anthony Jaswinski, who sells high-concept thrillers left and right).

Also, don't tell a manager that you have "dozens & dozens of scripts." You can tell them that over the years you've written dozens, but that they were you building your craft. Don't try to sell them an idea that you have a back catalogue of a bunch of available scripts. That will just make them think you have a slush pile of garbage. And they would tell you to pick only 1 or 2 of what you think is your best work and send it to them, and they'll evaluate you on those. Now, if both of those scripts just are mind-blowingly awesome, then they might want to read the others. But it's very unlikely that will be the case. There are thousands of very, very, very talented screenwriters in L.A. who can't get work. It takes a lot more than being a great writer.

tell me how to write a good script? without a script school.  On one forum I was advised to order the help of the guys from https://edubirdie.com/buy-dissertation so that they could help me edit my texts. and then they can be published on Internet resources or other digital publications. But I'm not sure if you can do it for me. What do you think?

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I Got good ideas for a motion picture and i write.

Its a shame that movie companies choose writers that are boring and believe in science more than the supernatural.

As political correctness and Progressive intellectualism ruins art with its prefered special effects and scientific real life scenarios.

The Childs play reboot was ruined with common ground science and the removal of the voodoo occultism original back story.

Removal of the voodoo story so that foreigners and native carribean peoples are not offended.

Scientific Normalcy and  Proper Acting Intellectualism ruins art and movies.

 

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