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  1. Hey everyone. As someone who makes game cinematics (Machinima) on YouTube I thought I'd make a list of features that would help myself and other filmmakers tell stories at Camp Crystal Lake. Don't get me wrong, I know that I'm a niche market and that resources should be spent on good gameplay first. But if even some of these features made it into the game it would make me giddy with joy, knowing that I could film my own Slasher cinematics with Jason and the counselors. HUD Toggle. Simply being able to turn off the HUD is a must have. This also includes anything like outlines of teammates, glowing items, etc. Spectator Cam. Allows us to stage shots to create a truly cinematic look. A lot of games have successfully implemented this: Battlefield, Rocket League, even the rudimentary camera in Rust by Facepunch Studios is incredibly useful. Camera Settings such as depth of field, zoom, tilt, easy-ease (choose how smooth the camera movement is), 3rd person free-cam (camera can freely rotate around a fixed player). Easy-ease is the most important, as a sharp, stilted camera is jarring and not very cinematic. Emotes such as waving, screaming, sitting, jumping, and talking. This is pretty crucial if you don't want characters to just walk, run and stand still. It's a great way of getting characters to "act". And if some emotes have mouth movement, then you can start adding dialogue to scenes to create something more compelling. In-game VOIP with mouth movement. I know this one could be a stretch. Games like Rust and Ark have it and it makes filming dialogue really manageable, even if it's not too realistic. Basically, if you can talk to teammates over your mic and your counselors mouth moves when you do this, then I can die happy. Admin/Lobby settings. If we're able to toggle most game variables in a private lobby then it saves a lot of time. Such as game length, god mode, character no-clip, spawns, weather, etc. Apologies for the essay. Feel free to reply with your thoughts or any additional ideas. Below is one of my horror cinematics filmed in Rust. Now imagine something similar in Friday The 13th. THE POTENTIAL!
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