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BomberBuddy

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  1. BomberBuddy

    So why does this happen?

    The victory can still be secured as long as you familiarize yourself with Jason's morph locations. For example, there are instances on Packanack Large where you can morph directly on the south road to stop a moving vehicle easily. Other spots drop you in the woods off-road. Crossing your fingers and hoping that the spot works is not efficient. The driver may continue forward, reverse, stop in place completely, or try to mind game with driving forward/backward/halt scenario. This is why it is important to morph to a precise chokepoint that gives Jason leverage. Morph to a spot where your shift will be able to last long enough to immobilize the car from the front or rear as necessary. Go into offline bots and practice morphing along the driving paths. Once you understand where the favorable morph spots are, you will be able to catch drivers off guard with a followup shift if you have to. Timing is important. It won't always work, but you have to try.
  2. One thing to add here: If you want to block on hit, you have to make sure the swing arc collides with solid geometry. Doors and counselors are destructible; they do not allow an immediate block. This explains why you should position yourself to the left of the door. Weapon passes through and eventually collides with the inner wall. Then you can immediately block. You'll still have to respect approximately 0.8 of a second where you cannot attack, but you'll be blocking instead of continuing the swing. It can be a little tricky to consecutively find that sweet spot, though. Combat stancing doors is more efficient. It's faster and allows player control to override the door-breaking animation. The greatest threat is getting your weapon stuck, which is like 2.5 seconds to recover from. Without combat stance, Jason is just as susceptible to being hit right when the door breaks as he is during the destruction animation anyway. Really the best advice to door combat for the Jason player is to stay unpredictable. The counselor can easily anticipate an attack if a predictable rhythm is established. Part 6 has no issue with door combat because he can combat stance and poke from a distance.
  3. BomberBuddy

    Oh Snap!

    Which word did you in?
  4. If the sweater is activated while Jason is recovering from a stun, he is cursed! Next weapon stun will bring him to his knees. Here is an example: It's pretty cool to know, especially if Jason is being evasive. Stun him, then activate sweater as the animation of coming out of the stun is visible. The moments where he is standing back up from a falling stun, tilting his body forward from a standing stun, or putting arm back down from firecrackers are when to activate sweater. He'll probably think you messed up and will try to regain the offensive. Easy kill.
  5. https://imgur.com/a/0HzwL Update to thread 1 Feb 2018: Pinehurst added. I took screenshots of each variation offline. They certainly are not as flashy and informative as Geekboxing's images (shown here: https://imgur.com/gallery/XzfIF), however I believe that they can still be of some use. Key information such as generator spawns and the phone box location will tell you exactly which version you are on. Knowing which variant is currently being played will also let you know exactly where Jason's shack is. Just be aware that generator spawns may overlap, like it does with Variants B and D on Crystal Lake Small. Just look for the phone box at one spot to know for certain. I did not focus on vehicle spawns because they are procedurally generated every game. They do have fixed locations, of course. Find a map for certainty.
  6. BomberBuddy

    What games are you looking forward to?

    Last Year looks appealing. I hope it will take the shortcomings of Dead By Daylight and Friday the 13th and refine gameplay. I hope they make each killer and survivor stand out. It seems like they are on the right track with specific roles for each survivor, but we won't know how it plays out until it gets brought into the spotlight. Hopefully in a few months, more info will be shared from the developers. In other news, Dark Souls Remastered just got announced. I hope it doesn't destroy the mechanics of the original.
  7. Repair roles can be beneficial when time is of the essence, but these characters are placed at a disadvantage when it comes to survivability. This is why characters like Vanessa or Chad are held in high regard. They may not be able to repair as efficiently under pressure compared to repair characters, but they have a better chance to hold out and survive due to stat allocation. Vanessa has her 6 Luck and her mobility and Chad has his 10 Luck and high speed. Maybe if they had made the game where only certain characters could repair objectives, we would have seen some better protection for people like Eric or Deborah. Team Fortress 2 comes to my mind for some reason in this regard. Characters have strengths and weaknesses in that game, and it encourages diversity when in the select screen. In Friday the 13th, anyone can repair. The speed and ease of repair can be overcome with patience. If you coordinate with others and repair objectives at the same time, it will still make Jason's head spin. Not only would he have to prevent objectives from being repaired, he would also have to deal with Vanessas and Chads. Both of these are versatile in the combat/repair scenario. They can still repair objectives in his face as long as they are defended. Since people have a fair understanding of Jason as an opponent, he is susceptible to aggressive retaliation. Combat is a reliable offensive play style. Players like Pappus have demystified the killer by exposing Jason's weaknesses in combat. Jason is much more approachable when you have the knowledge of how to fight. Grab range nerf, trap stacking nerf, hit detection, item marking, and arsenals at campfires only aid in Jason's downfall. Cooperation nullifies the need for repair characters. Plus, mechanics like stealth are useless. Combat is king. Kinda makes me wish that they didn't scrap the idea of unique player abilities. It could have potentially made each character stand out a bit more if implemented correctly.
  8. Traps don't work with Luck anymore. Each trap reduces health by 50%. Window damage has always been the same for every character. On topic, Jenny isn't worthless. Her high Luck gives her the power to fight, but she is objectively the weakest choice out of the fighter bunch (Chad and Vanessa). She is outclassed by Chad due to his maxed Luck and high Speed, and is outclassed by Vanessa due to her near perfect mobility with an excellent Stamina and Speed combo. Eight points in Luck gives Jenny one more wrench/pot/pan/machete hit compared to Vanessa's six Luck. Big deal. More stamina and speed gives Vanessa the potential to fight longer against Jason. Composure is a support stat. I'd be willing to say that it is slightly more valuable than Stealth or Strength, but not by much. We all know how valuable those stats are. Managing fear is like delaying the inevitable; if you survive long enough, you will gain fear, especially in Jason's presence. You will get sensed because if you are playing the fighting/repair role, you will encounter Jason. Losing the minimap and the screen going grey are minor visibility setbacks that can be worked around. Stumbling is increased with higher fear, but as long as adequate distance is maintained, it will be rare to die strictly because of a stumble. The noticeable drawback to high fear is the stamina regeneration penalty. You want to know how to get around that? Attacking Jason with melee. He is a resource begging to be tapped into. Unleash imperialistic fantasies upon him. High speed means better mobility. Speed is only useful with stamina management, but the difference is clear without it. Map control is important for combat characters. Being able to rush to someone's aid to draw aggro can mean the difference between life and death. Gathering survival items or objective parts will determine success. Time is important. This is Jenny's major weakness. Competitively, you want to be able to fight under the most strenuous conditions. Jenny is not the most optimized under those circumstances. Her mobility suffers due to an investment toward a mechanic that can be circumvented (with relative ease) by adapting a combat playstyle. This is why Chad and Vanessa are better choices. Otherwise, you'll just have to work a little harder for survival against a Jason with a solid understanding of gameplay. There is nothing wrong with a challenge, of course.
  9. BomberBuddy

    Throwing Knife Spam?

    Did you happen to enter and exit the driver seat of a car by any chance? Currently, there is a bug where your character can remain outside of the driver car door on Jason's screen. Then he can slash you to death even when you are nowhere near him from your perspective.
  10. BomberBuddy

    Weapon Swap & Stat System Detailed

    Wow, I love this idea! Incorporating Jason's strengths and weaknesses as bonuses to the weapons themselves would provide some variety for each Jason. Your strengths and weaknesses are nothing outright gamebreaking, either. They make sense and that is what matters. Thanks for providing a detailed system for your idea.
  11. Thanks, Alkavian. I had to do it. In the name of science! Also because the weapon list in the "How To Play" section is rather cryptic to understand, especially when luck plays a role in determining durability. The lack of numerical values makes it a disturbing reference point.
  12. I did a thing. I had some help. That thing is here: http://forum.f13game.com/topic/10596-the-playbook-techniques-and-strategies/?page=7&tab=comments#comment-199050 We can talk about it if you want. If not, that's fine. It's there, though. It's a list where the total amount of swings for each weapon are defined, the cost of durability for blocking Jason's attacks, and the amount of damage that can be blocked before being staggered and eventually: death. Minus Tommy Jarvis for the last one in particular. If you like combat, it may be of use. Thank you for your time.
  13. I have collected data on the amount of weapon swings a character has for fresh weapons found on the map. The amount of weapon swings, the way blocking manipulates durability, and counselor damage when blocking are here. All except Tommy Jarvis. That requires a few more bodies to be present. The opportunity I had to archive data was foiled, so I still don't have data to confirm for Tommy's blocking damage. One aspect to keep in mind is that Jason's weapon swings (weapon strength or no) and knives only count for one "point" across the board. The damage is different, but damage to the weapon while blocking will always be the same. I hope this helps in some way or another. If anyone discovers any discrepancies in gameplay, please let me know and I will look into it and change accordingly. Thank you. Weapon Swings 1 Luck: [Sheldon "Shelly" Finkelstein, A.J. Mason] Baseball Bat: 2 Axe: 2 2x4: 2 Fire Poker: 2 Pipe: 2 Branch: 2 Machete: 3 Pot: 3 Skillet: 3 Wrench: 3 2 Luck: [Mitch Floyd, Adam Palomino, Brandon "Buggzy" Wilson] Baseball Bat: 2 Axe: 2 2x4: 2 Fire Poker: 2 Pipe: 2 Branch: 3 Machete: 3 Pot: 4 Skillet: 4 Wrench: 4 3 Luck: [Deborah Kim, Fox] Baseball Bat: 2 Axe: 3 2x4: 3 Fire Poker: 3 Pipe: 3 Branch: 3 Machete: 4 Pot: 5 Skillet: 5 Wrench: 5 4 Luck: [Tiffany Cox] Baseball Bat: 3 Axe: 3 2x4: 3 Fire Poker: 3 Pipe: 3 Branch: 4 Machete: 5 Pot: 5 Skillet: 5 Wrench: 5 5 Luck: [Eric "J.R." LaChappa, Kenny Riedell] Baseball Bat: 3 Axe: 3 2x4: 3 Fire Poker: 3 Pipe: 3 Branch: 4 Machete: 5 Pot: 6 Skillet: 6 Wrench: 6 6 Luck: [Vanessa Jones] Baseball Bat: 4 Axe: 4 2x4: 4 Fire Poker: 4 Pipe: 4 Branch: 5 Machete: 6 Pot: 7 Skillet: 7 Wrench: 7 8 Luck: [Jenny Myers] Baseball Bat: 4 Axe: 4 2x4: 4 Fire Poker: 4 Pipe: 4 Branch: 6 Machete: 7 Pot: 8 Skillet: 8 Wrench: 8 10 Luck: [Tommy Jarvis, Chad Kensington] Baseball Bat: 5 Axe: 5 2x4: 5 Fire Poker: 5 Pipe: 5 Branch: 7 Machete: 9 Pot: 10 Skillet 10 Wrench: 10 How Blocking Affects Durability 1 Luck: [Sheldon "Shelly" Finkelstein, A.J. Mason] Baseball Bat 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1 block = no change 2-6 blocks = 1st swing lost 7 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1 block = no change 2-4 blocks = 1st swing lost 5 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1 block = no change 2-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-6 blocks = 2nd swing lost 7 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) 2 Luck: [Mitch Floyd, Adam Palomino, Brandon "Buggzy" Wilson] Baseball Bat 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-2 blocks = no change 3-7 blocks = 1st swing lost 8 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost lost 3-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-7 blocks = 3rd swing lost 8 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) 3 Luck: [Deborah Kim, Fox] Baseball Bat 1 block = no change 2-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4 blocks = 2nd swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-5 blocks = 1st swing lost 6-10 blocks = 2nd swing lost 11 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1 block = no change 2-4 blocks = 1st swing lost 5-6 blocks = 2nd swing lost 7 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-7 blocks = 3rd swing lost 8-10 blocks = 4th swing lost 11 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) 4 Luck: [Tiffany Cox] Baseball Bat 1-2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3-4 blocks = 2nd swing lost 5 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-2 blocks = no change 3-7 blocks = 1st swing lost 8-12 blocks = 2nd swing lost 13 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-8 blocks = 3rd swing lost 9 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1-2 blocks = no change 3-4 blocks = 1st swing lost 5-7 blocks = 2nd swing lost 8-9 blocks = 3rd swing lost 10-12 blocks = 4th swing lost 13 blocks = 5th swing lost (destoyed) 5 Luck: [Eric "J.R." LaChappa, Kenny Riedell] Baseball Bat 1 block = no change 2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3-4 blocks = 2nd swing lost 5 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-4 blocks = no change 5-9 blocks = 1st swing lost 10-14 blocks = 2nd swing lost 15 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1 block = no visible change 2-4 blocks = 1 point lost 5-6 blocks = 2 points lost 7-9 blocks = 3 points lost 10 blocks = 4 points lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1 block = no visible change 2-4 blocks = 1 point lost 5-6 blocks = 2 points lost 7-9 blocks = 3 points lost 10-11 blocks = 4 points lost 12-14 blocks = 5 points lost 15 blocks = 6 points lost (destroyed) 6 Luck: [Vanessa Jones] Baseball Bat 1 block = 1st swing lost 2-3 blocks = 2nd swing lost 4-5 blocks = 3rd swing lost 6 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-5 blocks = 1st swing lost 6-10 blocks = 2nd swing lost 11-15 blocks = 3rd swing lost 16 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost 6 blocks = 6th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-8 blocks = 3rd swing lost 9-10 blocks = 4th swing lost 11 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, skillet 1-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-8 blocks = 3rd swing lost 9-10 blocks = 4th swing lost 11-13 blocks = 5th swing lost 14-15 blocks = 6th swing lost 16 blocks = 7th swing lost (destroyed) 8 Luck: [Jenny Myers] Baseball Bat 1 block = no change 2-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4 blocks = 2nd swing lost 5-6 blocks = 3rd swing lost 7 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-4 blocks = no change 5-9 blocks = 1st swing lost 10-14 blocks = 2nd swing lost 15-19 blocks = 3rd swing lost 20 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost 6 blocks = 6th swing lost 7 blocks = 7th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-5 blocks = 2nd swing lost 6-8 blocks = 3rd swing lost 9-10 blocks = 4th swing lost 11-13 blocks = 5th swing lost 14 blocks = 6th swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1-2 blocks = no change 3-4 blocks = 1st swing lost 5-7 blocks = 2nd swing lost 8-9 blocks = 3rd swing lost 10-12 blocks = 4th swing lost 13-14 blocks = 5th swing lost 15-17 blocks = 6th swing lost 18-19 blocks = 7th swing lost 20 blocks = 8th swing lost (destroyed) 10 Luck: [Tommy Jarvis, Chad Kensington] Baseball Bat 1 block = no change 2 blocks = 1st swing lost 3-4 blocks = 2nd swing lost 5-6 blocks = 3rd swing lost 7-8 blocks = 4th swing lost 9 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) Axe 1-4 blocks = no change 5-9 blocks = 1st swing lost 10-14 blocks = 2nd swing lost 15-19 blocks = 3rd swing lost 20-24 blocks = 4th swing lost 25 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) 2x4, Fire Poker, Pipe 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost (destroyed) Machete 1 block = 1st swing lost 2 blocks = 2nd swing lost 3 blocks = 3rd swing lost 4 blocks = 4th swing lost 5 blocks = 5th swing lost 6 blocks = 6th swing lost 7 blocks = 7th swing lost 8 blocks = 8th swing lost 9 blocks = 9th swing lost (destroyed) Branch 1 block = no change 2-3 blocks = 1st swing lost 4-6 blocks = 2nd swing lost 7-8 blocks = 3rd swing lost 9-11 blocks = 4th swing lost 12-13 blocks = 5th swing lost 14-16 blocks = 6th swing lost 17 blocks = 7th swing lost (destroyed) Wrench, Pot, Skillet 1 block = no change 2-4 blocks = 1st swing lost 5-6 blocks = 2nd swing lost 7-9 blocks = 3rd swing lost 10-11 blocks = 4th swing lost 12-14 blocks = 5th swing lost 15-16 blocks = 6th swing lost 17-19 blocks = 7th swing lost 20-21 blocks = 8th swing lost 22-24 blocks = 9th swing lost 25 blocks = 10th swing lost (destroyed) Damage While Blocking Jason's Attacks (without Thick Skinned) Sheldon "Shelly" Finkelstein (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 12 strikes to stagger, killed on the 24th hit. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 15th hit Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 15th knife. A.J. Mason (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 11 strikes to stagger, killed on the 21st hit. Weapon Strength: 7 strikes to stagger, killed on the 14th hit. Throwing Knives: 7 to stagger, killed on the 14th knife. Mitch Floyd (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 11 strikes to stagger, killed on the 22nd strike. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 15th strike. Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 15th knife. Adam Palomino (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 12 strikes to stagger, killed on the 24th hit. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 16th strike. Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 16th knife. Brandon "Buggzy" Wilson (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 13 strikes to stagger, killed on the 25th hit. Weapon Strength: 9 strikes to stagger, killed on the 17th hit. Throwing Knives: 9 to stagger, killed on the 17th knife. Deborah Kim (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 11 strikes to stagger, killed on the 22nd strike. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 15th strike. Throwing Knives: 8 to injure, killed on the 15th knife. Fox (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 13 strikes to stagger, killed on the 25th hit. Weapon Strength: 9 strikes to stagger, killed on the 17th hit. Throwing Knives: 9 to injure, killed on the 17th knife. Tiffany Cox (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 12 strikes to stagger, killed on the 23rd hit. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 16th hit. Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 16th knife. Eric "J.R." LaChappa (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 12 strikes to stagger, killed on the 24th hit. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 16th strike. Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 16th knife. Kenny Riedell (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 13 strikes to stagger, killed on the 25th hit. Weapon Strength: 9 strikes to stagger, killed on the 17th hit. Throwing Knives: 9 to stagger, killed on the 17th knife. Vanessa Jones (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 13 strikes to stagger, killed on the 25th hit Weapon Strength: 9 strikes to stagger, killed on the 17th hit. Throwing Knives: 9 to stagger, killed on the 17th knife. Jenny Myers (while blocking) Non-Weapon Strength: 12 strikes to stagger, killed on the 24th hit. Weapon Strength: 8 strikes to stagger, killed on the 16th hit Throwing Knives: 8 to stagger, killed on the 16th knife. Tommy Jarvis (while blocking) [INCONCLUSIVE] Chad Kensington (while blocking) Non-weapon Strength: 13 strikes to stagger, killed on the 25th hit. Weapon Strength: 9 strikes to stagger, killed on the 17th hit. Throwing Knives: 9 to stagger, killed on the 17th knife. Conclusion Tommy eludes me with his missing data, but I am satisfied with everything else. (PS4) Special Thanks to: Xx3P1KxX_monkey for interchanging the roles as Jason and the counselors for testing purposes. He was in it for the long haul. PacoofAura for helping me figure out the health results while blocking with Deborah up to Jenny. andyj12345gamer for assisting with Tiffany's information along the road to comprehension. Savage_Nation25 for letting me beat him up as Chad and for assisting with Brandon's information along the road to comprehension. If you are feeling kind (and you have a Playstation account), consider thanking them for their efforts. I could not have done it without them, especially monkey. He was responsible for confirming past efforts, carving new ground, and also played the role as the "canvas" when I was a counselor instead of him.
  14. Wait...so if you are familiar with the combat mechanics of other games, what is your personal stance on swing cancelling? That's the most important part to consider. Every reply from you continues to peddle the developer's agenda when you call it an exploit. You are basing your arguments off of the definition of exploitation and the authoritarian ruling on the decision, without viewing the practicality of it in gameplay. To me, that does not justify its removal. Just because the devs have the power to remove gameplay features, doesn't make them always in the right (especially when it could have been collateral damage to Sliding, which is a game-breaking exploit). They are supposed to be improving the game. While it may not mean anything to one person, swing cancelling was valuable when you knew how to use it. So how did it help combat characters? Swing cancelling was a mind-game, it was a spacing technique, and it could have been used to save a durability strike on a stunned Jason or an exposed counselor (as @Aaron noted on page 1). What does this mean? For starters, it showed the Jason player that his prey was someone who could potentially cause him trouble. It could have made Jason wary about attacking head on, thus making him cautious. Which attack could be a real attack? Which attack could be a feint? The question would remain, and he would have to take advantage of spacing and attacks of his own. When trying to open up space with swing cancelling, Jason could have followed a similar mindset to the first technique: Spacing and offensive measures for himself. Creating space with a swing cancel countered the reaction time of a Jason player, no different than how Swift Attacker affects Jason's reaction time to a swing. Jason could have countered with knives, intentional misses with grabs / weapon strikes, restarting an encounter by utilizing abilities, and cutting the power to increase fear and slow stamina regeneration. This would have made it so as long as Jason was persistent, he could expect a greater chance for a committed swing rather than a swing cancel. Human beings make errors. Given enough effort, the counselor would be dealt with by continuously wearing them out with damage and proper distance. You said it yourself: We were just dead men walking anyway. Jason can have his win, but I'll be damned if I'm not going down without a fight. I like to play as the dramatic distractor because I am confident enough with my gameplay knowledge and experience to handle Jason, no matter who I am or where I am. It's a little selfish, but I want Jason all to my self. If he leaves, I repair objectives. If he comes back, I run, evade, and fight when I can. I cherish the combat because when I make a mistake, it's over. Jason wins. Then again, it's the journey that counts, right? It's about assessing your life and asking yourself: was it worth it? The answer sets the mood for closure to take place. When it comes to durability, every swing counts. Especially when you have low luck or have something valuable like the baseball bat or the axe. Stopping a swing could have prevented a wasted point, or worse: injury to a fellow player. The major downfall to swing cancelling was that it was a process required to initiate another exploit, one that was far more game-breaking: sliding. This technique makes it almost impossible to catch a player. Just because they have the power to remove it, doesn't mean they should have (especially when it could have been collateral damage to Sliding, which is a game-breaking exploit). @Tommy86 mentioned methods of other mind games, but it will never be the same as swing cancelling: Swing cancelling was an alternative method to the techniques written above. It could draw in Jason even more, thus making you his prime target in a pursuit. It could make space by countering the reaction time of Jason (much like swift attack does), and it saved you from wasting a weapon swing. Hunt the prey, but be wary of becoming the hunted. Even in death, I could leave this plane of existence knowing that I gave someone a worthy challenge in combat. Human beings are fallible, but the trick is to learn from the trials and tribulations of gameplay. It's the only way to get better.
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