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JyusannichiKibou

Showing friends F13 movies, but had to explain. =(

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So I started watching the F13 movies with friends who don't usually watch older films... And they were shocked that teenagers were going into bars. o.O;

Had to explain that once upon a time there was more freedom, and that in most states the 21-to-drink laws didn't get passed until the mid 80's... and that most places didn't really card much anyway.

 

Felt weird for me to explain since I'm way too young to have ever taken advantage of it. Some people just don't know their history and are used to not having the freedoms that were taken from them. =P

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So I started watching the F13 movies with friends who don't usually watch older films... And they were shocked that teenagers were going into bars. o.O;

Had to explain that once upon a time there was more freedom, and that in most states the 21-to-drink laws didn't get passed until the mid 80's... and that most places didn't really card much anyway.

 

Felt weird for me to explain since I'm way too young to have ever taken advantage of it. Some people just don't know their history and are used to not having the freedoms that were taken from them. =P

If you're talking about Part 2, they're not quite teens. I think the majority of counselors are of age while you'll find more teenagers in the films about groups of friends.

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If you're talking about Part 2, they're not quite teens. I think the majority of counselors are of age while you'll find more teenagers in the films about groups of friends.

 

OK now that I think about it, you might be right. They're all college friends right? So at least for one or two they mention that grad school is coming up (and wondering how to pay for it), so I guess that would make them college seniors, so about 21.

 

At the time it came out, the drinking age in New Jersey (where Crystal Lake is supposed to be) was 19 and in Connecticut (where it was filmed) it was 18, but I guess if they were 21 it's a moot point anyway. =)

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OK now that I think about it, you might be right. They're all college friends right? So at least for one or two they mention that grad school is coming up (and wondering how to pay for it), so I guess that would make them college seniors, so about 21.

At the time it came out, the drinking age in New Jersey (where Crystal Lake is supposed to be) was 19 and in Connecticut (where it was filmed) it was 18, but I guess if they were 21 it's a moot point anyway. =)

Yea. I can't remember off hand but Ginny was studying child psychology.

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Yea. I can't remember off hand but Ginny was studying child psychology.

 

Yeah, she was. Cause she makes remarks about using it on Paul. I also think that kind of sets up her idea to use Pam's sweater too.  

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So I started watching the F13 movies with friends who don't usually watch older films... And they were shocked that teenagers were going into bars. o.O;

Had to explain that once upon a time there was more freedom, and that in most states the 21-to-drink laws didn't get passed until the mid 80's... and that most places didn't really card much anyway.

 

Felt weird for me to explain since I'm way too young to have ever taken advantage of it. Some people just don't know their history and are used to not having the freedoms that were taken from them. =P

Sadly, you are quite right. That is why we older folks stick to our values, and teach those less fortunate, or informed about how things used to be, and can be again. Family values, not accepting trash media, striving for better goals, etc. ;)

 

Very good post! ;)

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Sadly, you are quite right. That is why we older folks stick to our values, and teach those less fortunate, or informed about how things used to be, and can be again. Family values, not accepting trash media, striving for better goals, etc. ;)

 

Very good post! ;)

 

...except I think F13 falls under "trash media". Or maybe it's just "trashy media", vs. just trash. =)

 

When I was a kid me and the neighborhood kids often played in a dump that we'd sneak into. Dug out all sorts of cool things, like bicycle parts, fixed a shortwave radio from it, etc. Plus that's where we got our porn since while you could download porn (slowly!) online at the time it would be grainy super low-resolution low-color stuff.

 

So there's value in trash!

 

Also, on first reading, I read that as "striving for better goats".

 

So my "old man" views are mostly limited to complaining about overprotective culture these days. You really are safer from most dangers than you've ever been. Your kids are safer. It's okay if they ride their bike to school -- it's okay that they might skin their knee. When they get older, don't freak out if they happened to find a can of beer or shoot off bottle rockets.

 

The real dangers that have increased are things like job insecurity, excessive fees from faceless corporations, getting your home foreclosed on, echo-chamber lack of critical thinking, etc. =P

 

...but yeah, I think everybody needs to be reminded about the good stuff that used to exist!

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So my "old man" views are mostly limited to complaining about overprotective culture these days. You really are safer from most dangers than you've ever been. Your kids are safer. It's okay if they ride their bike to school -- it's okay that they might skin their knee. When they get older, don't freak out if they happened to find a can of beer or shoot off bottle rockets.

 

The real dangers that have increased are things like job insecurity, excessive fees from faceless corporations, getting your home foreclosed on, echo-chamber lack of critical thinking, etc. =P

 

...but yeah, I think everybody needs to be reminded about the good stuff that used to exist!

That is where we 180 degrees disagree. There has never been a more dangerous world than we live in now. You said yourself that freedoms have been stripped from society, I assure you, it's not for 'our' benefit, or that of our children. Who ever heard of GMO's in food in the 70's? Fluoride in our drinking water?, Chemtrails? or active use of H.A.R.P? "Friday" is trash media, but for entertainment purposes, much like "Creature From the Black Lagoon" back in the 50's, true trash media is the constant lies told to the populace to further government agendas.

Trash can indeed be a treasure, but today it can get you killed. God, I miss the good 'ole days, even without the tech, and often times, especially without it. (Kids don't play outside anymore.)

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So I started watching the F13 movies with friends who don't usually watch older films... And they were shocked that teenagers were going into bars. o.O;

 

Had to explain that once upon a time there was more freedom, and that in most states the 21-to-drink laws didn't get passed until the mid 80's... and that most places didn't really card much anyway.

 

Felt weird for me to explain since I'm way too young to have ever taken advantage of it. Some people just don't know their history and are used to not having the freedoms that were taken from them. =P

For those of us born before the digital age that watched the technological boom and transition, we've had the benefit to see the world before the Internet and Twitter. Hell, I remember seeing the Berlin Wall fall and at the time being young, I had no idea just how significant an event it was. We are probably the last of our kind, much like my great granddad was one of the few people I knew to live through two world wars. It's funny the little things we see and don't see in transitional eras without truly realizing it.

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For those of us born before the digital age that watched the technological boom and transition, we've had the benefit to see the world before the Internet and Twitter. Hell, I remember seeing the Berlin Wall fall and at the time being young, I had no idea just how significant an event it was. We are probably the last of our kind, much like my great granddad was one of the few people I knew to live through two world wars. It's funny the little things we see and don't see in transitional eras without truly realizing it.

 

Yup, it's the biggest societal shift in over a century. (The industrial age killed the isolated village, the very misnamed "space age" killed the shared public space, and now the digital age is killing physical interaction altogether!) There are great things about it, but there are horrible things about it to.

 

It's amazing, but very stressful for humans. In the age of villages, people mostly stayed put. People could have pride in what they did because it was easy to for instance, be the best blacksmith or the best stringed instrument player, or whatever -- you just had to work for it. If there were problems, you could move three villages over and start afresh because mobility was hard, so whatever social situation you left, it would very probably not put in the effort to follow you.

 

Now whatever you do, it's compared to the global village as a whole. The person who would have been the best guitar player in the little village is now a nameless mediocre one since the "village" is the whole planet. It's crushing to self-esteem. There's only one planet and you can't move to the next one. Everything posted online is forever -- a dumb picture posted of you as a teenager impacts your job, social, and political life when you're 40. (Now that millennials are starting to become politicians, it's becoming *very* apparent -- everyone's baggage is a search engine away! Only luddites will be able to become senators and presidents.)

 

Fixing these problems will require people recognizing them though. There will never be a "little village" ever again, but we can at least try to address the effects of what we lost.

 

That is where we 180 degrees disagree. There has never been a more dangerous world than we live in now. You said yourself that freedoms have been stripped from society, I assure you, it's not for 'our' benefit, or that of our children. Who ever heard of GMO's in food in the 70's? Fluoride in our drinking water?, Chemtrails? or active use of H.A.R.P? "Friday" is trash media, but for entertainment purposes, much like "Creature From the Black Lagoon" back in the 50's, true trash media is the constant lies told to the populace to further government agendas.

Trash can indeed be a treasure, but today it can get you killed. God, I miss the good 'ole days, even without the tech, and often times, especially without it. (Kids don't play outside anymore.)

 

What I meant to say is that you are safer from the things people are traditionally told to worry about. You are way less likely to be mugged. You are way less likely to be murdered. People freak out about their kids being abducted, but statistically you'd have to leave them out alone for 10,000 years for them to have a better than 50/50 chance of being abducted.

 

People don't see the real risks, and the media encourages it. Humans suck at risk assessment. Nobody thinks about the riskiest short term preventable thing people do -- getting in an automobile. Want to save your life? Ride transit. And of course the single biggest preventable risk is junk food!

 

So I'm not saying that the world isn't dangerous -- just that the boogeyman dangers we are *told* to worry about by the media are not the real ones. So when I say people are "safer", I mean they are safer from those.

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Yup, it's the biggest societal shift in over a century. (The industrial age killed the isolated village, the very misnamed "space age" killed the shared public space, and now the digital age is killing physical interaction altogether!) There are great things about it, but there are horrible things about it to.

It's amazing, but very stressful for humans. In the age of villages, people mostly stayed put. People could have pride in what they did because it was easy to for instance, be the best blacksmith or the best stringed instrument player, or whatever -- you just had to work for it. If there were problems, you could move three villages over and start afresh because mobility was hard, so whatever social situation you left, it would very probably not put in the effort to follow you.

Now whatever you do, it's compared to the global village as a whole. The person who would have been the best guitar player in the little village is now a nameless mediocre one since the "village" is the whole planet. It's crushing to self-esteem. There's only one planet and you can't move to the next one. Everything posted online is forever -- a dumb picture posted of you as a teenager impacts your job, social, and political life when you're 40. (Now that millennials are starting to become politicians, it's becoming *very* apparent -- everyone's baggage is a search engine away! Only luddites will be able to become senators and presidents.)

 

Fixing these problems will require people recognizing them though. There will never be a "little village" ever again, but we can at least try to address the effects of what we lost.

 

 

 

What I meant to say is that you are safer from the things people are traditionally told to worry about. You are way less likely to be mugged. You are way less likely to be murdered. People freak out about their kids being abducted, but statistically you'd have to leave them out alone for 10,000 years for them to have a better than 50/50 chance of being abducted.

 

People don't see the real risks, and the media encourages it. Humans suck at risk assessment. Nobody thinks about the riskiest short term preventable thing people do -- getting in an automobile. Want to save your life? Ride transit. And of course the single biggest preventable risk is junk food!

 

So I'm not saying that the world isn't dangerous -- just that the boogeyman dangers we are *told* to worry about by the media are not the real ones. So when I say people are "safer", I mean they are safer from those.

 

I believe the risks are greater in all respects today....because of desperation. Recreational drug use, for example, is soo risky today than say, the 70's or 80's. When a naked black man in Florida, kills and eats pedestrians under a turnpike, and it takes 16 rounds to put him down...that's crazy shit. Abductions, sex slavery, the list goes on and on. In the 60's the Manson/Sharon Tate murders were a huge thing, today it would barely make the 6 o'clock. Not to mention open boarders to illegals from other countries, that sure aren't coming over to wish us well. Also, biased media, SJW topics, agenda laden government, etc.

Growing up in the 70's and 80's, i'd take those decades any day, things were wild, but also simple. You didn't have to watch behind you, every 5 seconds. Morality was more prevalent back then as well, and families were closer. Elders were respected, and the youth was taught free thinking. The results are what you see in 80's and 70's media art forms we still cherish today, like this project.

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I believe the risks are greater in all respects today....because of desperation. Recreational drug use, for example, is soo risky today than say, the 70's or 80's. When a naked black man in Florida, kills and eats pedestrians under a turnpike, and it takes 16 rounds to put him down...that's crazy shit. Abductions, sex slavery, the list goes on and on. In the 60's the Manson/Sharon Tate murders were a huge thing, today it would barely make the 6 o'clock. Not to mention open boarders to illegals from other countries, that sure aren't coming over to wish us well. Also, biased media, SJW topics, agenda laden government, etc.

Growing up in the 70's and 80's, i'd take those decades any day, things were wild, but also simple. You didn't have to watch behind you, every 5 seconds. Morality was more prevalent back then as well, and families were closer. Elders were respected, and the youth was taught free thinking. The results are what you see in 80's and 70's media art forms we still cherish today, like this project.

 

The thing is the *perceived* risk of crime has risen due to more media saturation. If you look at the raw numbers, violent crime has gone down. You mention having to watch behind you, but it was way more likely for someone to shank you in the back in the 70's. There were more serial killers, more abductions, etc. The global information stream means we always see the craziest most out-there stuff, and it makes it seem more common.  Perception is the biggest change. The rate of rape has increased dramatically, but that's largely because the definition of rape has expanded. (This is why Sweden seems like the rape capital of the world if you look at government statistics, even though by any logical measure it isn't.)

 

Flakka is crazy now, but people did crazy stuff on PCP back in the 70's.

 

That said, I agree 100% that the media restrictions now, "feels", sensitivities, etc. have resulted in some ugly censorship that we didn't have in the 70's and 80's. What I'm saying is that this is a direct result of the risk-averse nature of our current society. It's a result of fear. The reason we don't have the free-wheeling art of the 70's is the same reason the cops arrest parents for letting their kids ride their bicycle to school. People are afraid and are out to get the "bad guy". The "bad guy" used to be the fuzzily-defined threat of communism. Now we see the "bad guy" among ourselves and it tears our culture apart.

 

That's why you have people foaming at the mouth to have their "safe spaces" on campus. "Safe spaces" which are really just echo chambers where all dissenting thought is squashed. People are obsessed with being "safe". Meanwhile people in the heartland want to be kept "safe" from the "gay agenda". Obsession with keeping ourselves safe from each other means we fear each other, which in turn makes us hurt each other in our mindless quest for safety.

 

I'd rather be afraid of Jason Voorhees. And by afraid, I mean not truly afraid since I know he doesn't really exist. =)

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I think I understand where you are coming from. However, unless you lived through those eras, don't believe the numbers. Massive government involvement has put forth false information for their own agendas. How do I know? I use to work for them. Holding an 'Above Top Secret Security Clearance'. I saw the politics involved while I was in the service, and it actually swayed me to leave. I could fill volumes of the things I saw while 'In the Sandbox', but home on leave, seen the news turn it 180 degrees, or not report it at all.

 

I wish it were the other way, unfortunately, it isn't. People are labeled 'conspiracy theorists', a term itself that was C.I.A. sanctioned, for a free thinking society that calls out the discrepancies of government wrong-doings, to make the crimes get 'swept under the rug'. I've already said too much, but given the choice, I would go back to those times, and not worry about my childrens future, or mine for that matter, as much as I do now.

 

The good news is, we can return to a semblance of what 'once was', with informed decision making, and standing up for what is right in our hearts. History teaches many lessons, but so does situational awareness and bravery to act. Drive-Ins for the family may return one day, and agenda laden movies will be a thing of the past, alot can be learned by older generations examples. Mom and apple pie are not bad things, what is spewing now, unfortunately is and would have zero effective range back then. The billionaires of today could care less about the future, ours or theirs. They just don't get the impact of what is being done, until it will be too late. Kind of like Frankenstein, Mary Shelley was quite the genius.

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I let my friend borrow my box set he said he never liked them i told him he was wrong a herbert and should be hung in public 

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5 minutes ago, Bishi Boshi said:

I let my friend borrow my box set he said he never liked them i told him he was wrong a herbert and should be hung in public 

Uncultured heathens. The lot of them. :lol:

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My non-Friday friends who put up with my shit on Friday the 13th all seem to un-ironically enjoy Jason X.

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2 hours ago, Bishi Boshi said:

I let my friend borrow my box set he said he never liked them i told him he was wrong a herbert and should be hung in public 

Man we don't hang herberts, they're a drag but still we are one! You reach?

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